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Interpreting the Value Effect Through the Q-Theory: An Empirical Investigation

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  • Yuhang Xing
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    Abstract

    This article interprets the well-known value effect through the implications of standard Q-theory. An investment growth factor, defined as the difference in returns between low-investment stocks and high-investment stocks, contains information similar to the Fama and French (1993) value factor (HML), and can explain the value effect about as well as HML. In the cross-section, portfolios of firms with low investment growth rates (IGRs) or low investment-to-capital ratios have significantly higher average returns than those with high IGRs or high investment-to-capital ratios. The value effect largely disappears after controlling for investment, and the investment effect is robust against controls for the marginal product of capital. These results are consistent with the predictions of a standard Q-theory model with a stochastic discount factor. The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for Financial Studies. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Society for Financial Studies in its journal The Review of Financial Studies.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 1767-1795

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:21:y:2008:i:4:p:1767-1795

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    Cited by:
    1. Watanabe, Akiko & Xu, Yan & Yao, Tong & Yu, Tong, 2013. "The asset growth effect: Insights from international equity markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 529-563.
    2. Stambaugh, Robert F. & Yu, Jianfeng & Yuan, Yu, 2012. "The short of it: Investor sentiment and anomalies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 288-302.
    3. Butler, Alexander W. & Cornaggia, Jess & Grullon, Gustavo & Weston, James P., 2011. "Corporate financing decisions, managerial market timing, and real investment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 666-683, September.
    4. Amit Goyal, 2012. "Empirical cross-sectional asset pricing: a survey," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 3-38, March.
    5. Lam, F.Y. Eric C. & Wei, K.C. John, 2011. "Limits-to-arbitrage, investment frictions, and the asset growth anomaly," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(1), pages 127-149, October.
    6. Xiaoji Lin & Lu Zhang, 2011. "Covariances versus Characteristics in General Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 17285, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Lin, Xiaoji, 2012. "Endogenous Technological Progress and the Cross Section of Stock Returns," Working Paper Series 2012-22, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    8. Prombutr, Wikrom & Phengpis, Chanwit & Zhang, Ying, 2012. "What explains the investment growth anomaly?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 2532-2542.
    9. Cooper, Ilan & Priestley, Richard, 2011. "Real investment and risk dynamics," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 182-205, July.
    10. Huang, Dayong & Wang, Fang, 2009. "Cash, investments and asset returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 2301-2311, December.
    11. Dongmei Li & Lu Zhang, 2008. "Costly External Finance: Implications for Capital Markets Anomalies," NBER Working Papers 14342, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Ye, Qing & Turner, John D., 2014. "The cross-section of stock returns in an early stock market," QUCEH Working Paper Series 14-05, Queen's University Centre for Economic History, Queen's University Belfast.
    13. Li, Dongmei & Zhang, Lu, 2010. "Does q-theory with investment frictions explain anomalies in the cross section of returns?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 297-314, November.
    14. Robert F. Stambaugh & Jianfeng Yu & Yu Yuan, 2012. "The Long of It: Odds that Investor Sentiment Spuriously Predicts Anomaly Returns," NBER Working Papers 18231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Kang, Hankil & Kang, Jangkoo & Lee, Changjun, 2013. "Do the production-based factors capture the time-varying patterns in stock returns?," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 122-135.

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