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Racial Preferences in Dating

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  • Raymond Fisman
  • Sheena S. Iyengar
  • Emir Kamenica
  • Itamar Simonson
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    Abstract

    We examine racial preferences in dating. We employ a Speed Dating experiment that allows us to directly observe individual decisions and thus infer whose preferences lead to racial segregation in romantic relationships. Females exhibit stronger racial preferences than males. The richness of our data further allows us to identify many determinants of same-race preferences. Subjects' backgrounds, including the racial composition of the ZIP code where a subject grew up and the prevailing racial attitudes in a subject's state or country of origin, strongly influence same-race preferences. Older subjects and more physically attractive subjects exhibit weaker same-race preferences. Copyright 2008, Wiley-Blackwell.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-937X.2007.00465.x
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal The Review of Economic Studies.

    Volume (Year): 75 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 117-132

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:75:y:2008:i:1:p:117-132

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    Cited by:
    1. Barr, Abigail & Dekker, Marleen & Fafchamps, Marcel, 2012. "Bridging the Gender Divide: An Experimental Analysis of Group Formation in African Villages," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 2063-2077.
    2. Baccara, Mariagiovanna & Collard-Wexler, Allan & Felli, Leonardo & Yariv, Leeat, 2010. "Gender and Racial Biases: Evidence from Child Adoption," CEPR Discussion Papers 7647, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Dufloi & Maitreesh Ghatak & Jeanne Lafortune, 2012. "Marry for What? Caste and Mate Selection in Modern India," Documentos de Trabajo 423, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    4. Margherita Comola & Marcel Fafchamps, 2009. "Testing Unilateral and Bilateral Link Formation," CSAE Working Paper Series 2009-13, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    5. Jason M. Fletcher & Stephen L. Ross & Yuxiu Zhang, 2013. "The Determinants and Consequences of Friendship Composition," Working papers 2013-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    6. Günter Hitsch & Ali Hortaçsu & Dan Ariely, 2010. "What makes you click?—Mate preferences in online dating," Quantitative Marketing and Economics, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 393-427, December.
    7. Chunbei Wang & Le Wang, 2012. "The effects of 9/11 on intermarriage between natives and immigrants to the U.S," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-192, June.
    8. Andrew Zuppann, 2011. "The Impact of Emergency Contraception on Dating and Marriage," Working Papers 201310815, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
    9. Nicolas Gérard Vaillant & François-Charles Wolff, 2010. "Positive and negative preferences in human mate selection," Working Papers hal-00455160, HAL.

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