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Cheating in Contests

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Author Info

  • Ian Preston

Abstract

Much of the interest in the study of sports from the perspective of an economist lies in the empirical application of contests as efficient mechanisms for eliciting effort. Contestants respond to contest incentives, and these incentives include the incentive to cheat. This paper discusses different forms of cheating: sabotage, doping, and match fixing. The paper discusses how these forms of cheating arise and how they can be treated. In particular, we look at specific forms of cheating in soccer, baseball, and cricket. In the appendix we develop a simple model of match fixing. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Review of Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 19 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 (Winter)
Pages: 612-624

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:19:y:2003:i:4:p:612-624

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Web page: http://oxrep.oupjournals.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Kräkel, Matthias, 2006. "Doping and Cheating in Contest-Like Situations," IZA Discussion Papers 2059, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Charness, Gary & Masclet, David & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2013. "The Dark Side of Competition for Status," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt3858888w, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
  3. Raul Caruso, 2009. "The Basic Economics of Match Fixing in Sport Tournaments," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(3), pages 355-377, December.
  4. Krakel, Matthias, 2007. "Doping and cheating in contest-like situations," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 988-1006, December.
  5. Christiane Schwieren & Doris Weichselbaumer, 2008. "Does competition enhance performance or cheating? A laboratory experiment," NRN working papers 2008-05, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  6. Curry Philip A. & Mongrain Steeve, 2009. "Deterrence in Rank-Order Tournaments," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 723-740, December.
  7. Matthias Kräkel, 2005. "Doping in Contest-Like Situations," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse14_2005, University of Bonn, Germany.
  8. Caruso, Raul, 2007. "THE Economics of Match-Fixing," MPRA Paper 3085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Nicolas Eber, 2009. "Doping and Fair Play," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(3), pages 345-347, December.
  10. Helmut Dietl & Christian Weingärtner, 2012. "Betting scandals and attenuated property rights - How betting related match fixing can be prevented in future," Working Papers 0154, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  11. Raul Caruso, 2008. "Il calcio tra mercato, relazioni e coercizione," Rivista di Diritto ed Economia dello Sport, Centro di diritto e business dello Sport, vol. 4(1), pages 71-88, Aprile.

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