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Causes and consequences of civil strife: micro-level evidence from Uganda

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  • Klaus Deininger

Abstract

To bridge the gap between case studies and highly aggregate cross-country analyses of civil unrest, we use data from Uganda to explore determinants of civil strife (as contrasted to theft and physical violence) at the community level, as well as the potentially differential impact of these variables on investment and non-agricultural enterprise formation at the household level. We find that distance from infrastructure (a proxy for scarcity of economic opportunities and government investment), asset inequality (social tension), presence of cash crops (expropriable wealth), and lower levels of human capital (ability to take advantage of opportunities in the 'regular' economy) all increase the propensity for civil strife. Furthermore, civil strife, in marked contrast to violence and theft, reduces investment and non-agricultural enterprise startups. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 55 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 579-606

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:55:y:2003:i:4:p:579-606

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Cited by:
  1. Dominic Rohner, 2010. "From rags to rifles: deprivation, conflict and the welfare state," IEW - Working Papers, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich 463, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  2. María Alejandra Arias & Ana María Ibáñez & Andrés Zambrano, 2014. "Agricultural Production Amid Conflict: The Effects of Shocks, Uncertainty, and Governance of Non-State Armed Actors," DOCUMENTOS CEDE, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE 011005, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  3. Oloufade, Djoulassi K., 2012. "Trade Openness, Conflict Risk and Income Inequality," MPRA Paper 40702, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2013.

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