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Union coverage and non-standard work in Britain

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Author Info

  • Alison L. Booth
  • Marco Francesconi

Abstract

Using representative data from the British Household Panel Survey for the period 1991--97, we document the extent of union coverage across standard and non-standard workers in Britain. Non-standard employment--defined in terms of contracts, places, times, and hours of work--involves approximately 60% of the employed population. Most workers in non-standard employment are less likely to be union covered than otherwise identical workers in standard employment. In particular, women across nearly all types of non-standard jobs are significantly less likely to be covered than women in regular employment. For men, this negative relationship is only found for those working on fixed term contracts or short hours. Gender differences are therefore large and significant. We cannot detect an expansion of union coverage towards any type of non-standard employment over our sample period. Finally, we find significant differences in the relationship between non-standard work and union coverage in the private and public sectors. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 55 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 383-416

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:55:y:2003:i:3:p:383-416

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Cited by:
  1. Louis N. Christofides & Alexandros Polycarpou & Konstantinos Vrachimis, 2013. "Gender Wage Gaps, 'Sticky Floors' and 'Glass Ceilings' in Europe," Working Papers 1301, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  2. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2006. "Is There a Glass Ceiling over Europe? Exploring the Gender Pay Gap across the Wages Distribution," CEPR Discussion Papers 510, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Antonczyk, Dirk & Fitzenberger, Bernd & Sommerfeld, Katrin, 2010. "Rising Wage Inequality, the Decline of Collective Bargaining, and the Gender Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 4911, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Marco Francesconi and Carlos Garcia-Serrano, 2002. "Unions, temporary employment and hours of work: a tale of two countries," Doctorado en Economía- documentos de trabajo 8/02, Programa de doctorado en Economía. Universidad de Alcalá., revised 01 May 2002.
  5. Christofides, Louis N. & Polycarpou, Alexandros & Vrachimis, Konstantinos, 2010. "The Gender Wage Gaps, 'Sticky Floors' and 'Glass Ceilings' of the European Union," IZA Discussion Papers 5044, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Bardasi, Elena & Francesconi, Marco, 2004. "The impact of atypical employment on individual wellbeing: evidence from a panel of British workers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(9), pages 1671-1688, May.

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