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Labor Market Discrimination, Imperfect Information and Self Employment

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  • Coate, Stephen
  • Tennyson, Sharon

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of labor market discrimination on the self employment returns of those discriminated against. It demonstrates that, in situations of imperfect information, labor market discrimination can "spill over" into markets relevant to self employment, creating seemingly discriminatory outcomes in these markets. Thus, credit market discrimination or consumer discrimination against minority entrepreneurs could arise as an indirect effect of labor market discrimination. The existence of these spillover effects is shown to have two important implications for self employment outcomes. First, labor market discrimination is likely to yield lower expected returns from self employment for individuals from discriminated against groups. Second, labor market discrimination may actually result in those discriminated against having less incentive to enter self-employment than individuals from other groups. Copyright 1992 by Royal Economic Society.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 44 (1992)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 272-88

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:44:y:1992:i:2:p:272-88

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Cited by:
  1. Bruce D. Meyer, 1990. "Why Are There So Few Black Entrepreneurs?," NBER Working Papers 3537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Ruth Oyelere & Willie Belton, 2013. "Black–White gap in self-employment. Does intra-race heterogeneity exist?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 25-39, June.
  3. Williams, Donald R., 2009. "Gender Discrimination and Self-Employment Dynamics in Europe," IRISS Working Paper Series 2009-20, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
  4. Demyanyk, Yuliya, 2008. "U.S. banking deregulation and self-employment: A differential impact on those in need," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 165-178.
  5. Nigar Hashimzade & Yulia Rodionova, 2013. "Gender Bias in Access to Finance, Occupational Choice, and Business Performance," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2013-01, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  6. Fender, John, 2005. "Self employment, education and credit constraints: A model of interdependent credit rationing decisions," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 31-51, March.
  7. François Combarnous, 1994. "Discrimination et marché du travail : concepts et théories," Documents de travail 02, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  8. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2013-01 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "The Absence of the African-American Owned Business: An Analysis of the Dynamics of Self-Employment," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt49c4n0fg, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  10. Elena Bardasi & Shwetlena Sabarwal & Katherine Terrell, 2011. "How do female entrepreneurs perform? Evidence from three developing regions," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 417-441, November.
  11. Christophe Muller, 2003. "Female Activity Choice In A Dual Context: An Integrated Model For Formal And Informal Sectors In Cameroon," Working Papers. Serie AD 2003-39, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

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