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Hysteresis and "The Japanese Unemployment Problem": A Preliminary Investigation

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  • Brunello, Giorgio

Abstract

The Blanchard-Summers model of unemployment hysteresis is a very popular explanation of the recent European experience. This paper asks if the same model can be used to explain the Japanese experience. The answer is that hysteresis cannot be easily dismissed from recent Japanese data. They contain as much hysteresis as the European data. The paper explains some of the differences between Japan and Europe in terms of labor supply behaviors and indexation to unexpected real shocks. Copyright 1990 by Royal Economic Society.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 42 (1990)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 483-500

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:42:y:1990:i:3:p:483-500

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Cited by:
  1. Cuestas, Juan C. & Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Staehr, Karsten, 2011. "A further investigation of unemployment persistence in European transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 514-532.
  2. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen M. Miller & Stephen K. Pollard, 2013. "Unemployment Rate Hysteresis and the Great Recession: Exploring the Metropolitan Evidence," Working papers 2013-19, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  3. Chang, Tsangyao, 2011. "Hysteresis in unemployment for 17 OECD countries: Stationary test with a Fourier function," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 2208-2214, September.
  4. Alistair Dieppe & Jerome Henry & Peter Mc Adam, . "Labour market dynamics in the euro area: A model-based sensitivity analysis," Modeling, Computing, and Mastering Complexity 2003 09, Society for Computational Economics.
  5. Tsangyao Chang & Kuei-Chiu Lee & Chien-Chung Nieh & Ching-Chun Wei, 2005. "An empirical note on testing hysteresis in unemployment for ten European countries: panel SURADF approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(14), pages 881-886.
  6. Giray Gozgor, 2013. "Testing Unemployment Persistence in Central and Eastern European Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 3(3), pages 694-700.
  7. Cheng, Shu-Ching & Wu, Tsung-pao & Lee, Kuei-Chiu & Chang, Tsangyao, 2014. "Flexible Fourier unit root test of unemployment for PIIGS countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 142-148.
  8. Lee, Cheng-Feng & Hu, Te-Chung & Li, Ping-Cheng & Tsong, Ching-Chuan, 2013. "Asymmetric behavior of unemployment rates: Evidence from the quantile covariate unit root test," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 72-84.
  9. Lee, Cheng-Feng, 2010. "Testing for unemployment hysteresis in nonlinear heterogeneous panels: International evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1097-1102, September.
  10. Mariam Camarero & Josep Lluís Carrion-i-Silvestre & Cecilio Tamarit, 2004. "Testing for hysteresis in unemployment in OECD countries. New evidence using stationarity panel tests with breaks†," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces 2004/40, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  11. Liew, Venus Khim-Sen & Chia, Ricky Chee-Jiun & Puah, Chin-Hong, 2009. "Does Hysteresis in Unemployment Occur in OECD Countries? Evidence from Parametric and Non-Parametric Panel Unit Roots Tests," MPRA Paper 9915, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Mariam Camarero & Josep Lluis Carrion Silvestre & Cecilio Tamarit, 2004. "Testing for hysteresis in unemployment in OECD countries. New evidence using stationarity panel tests with breaks," Working Papers in Economics 119, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
  13. Sharon Kozicki, 2001. "Why do central banks monitor so many inflation indicators?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III, pages 5-42.
  14. Pablo, Agnese & Hector, Sala, 2008. "Unemployment in Japan: A look at the ‘lost decade’," MPRA Paper 14332, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Hesna Genay & Prakash Loungani, 1997. "Labor market fluctuations in Japan and the U.S.--how similar are they?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue May, pages 15-28.
  16. Cheng, Ka Ming & Durmaz, Nazif & Kim, Hyeongwoo & Stern, Michael L., 2012. "Hysteresis vs. natural rate of US unemployment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 428-434.
  17. Miguel A. León-Ledesma, 2000. "Unemployment Hysteresis in the US and the EU: a Panel Data Approach," Studies in Economics 0006, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  18. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth, 2005. "Is there a Natural Rate of Crime?," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 18/05, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  19. Panigo, Demian & Féliz, Mariano & Perez, Pablo, 2004. "Macro and microeconomic persistence in regional unemployment. The case of Argentina," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 0403, CEPREMAP.
  20. Aviral Tiwari, 2014. "Unemployment hysteresis in Australia: evidence using nonlinear and stationarity tests with breaks," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 681-695, March.
  21. Juan Carlos Cuestas & Luis A. Gil-Alana, 2009. "Unemployment hysteresis, structural changes, non-linearities and fractional integration in Central and Eastern Europe," Working Papers 2009/6, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
  22. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chang, Chun-Ping, 2008. "Unemployment hysteresis in OECD countries: Centurial time series evidence with structural breaks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 312-325, March.

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