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The Value of a Nutritionally Enhanced Staple Crop: Results from a Choice Experiment Conducted with Orange-fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Mozambique

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  • Abdul T. A. Naico
  • Jayson L. Lusk

Abstract

A number of strategies have been proposed to reduce nutritional deficiencies in developing countries. In this paper, we investigated the extent to which consumers in Mozambique would be willing to consume new varieties of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSPs), which are rich in vitamin A, relative to the traditionally consumed white sweet potato varieties. Using data from a choice experiment administered in person with sweet potato shoppers, we find consumers are willing to pay premiums for OFSPs if they can be produced to possess eating quality similar to traditional varieties. Although consumers prefer orange flesh to the white, dry matter content was the most important quality attribute. Thus, for the nutritional benefits of the new varieties to be realised, plant-breeding programmes should focus on improving the dry matter content of the new orange flesh varieties. Finally, our results indicate that preferences for OFSPs are influenced by information about nutritional benefits, whether the questioning format provided incentives for people to think carefully about their responses, and whether people resided in urban or rural locations. Copyright 2010 The author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) in its journal Journal of African Economies.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 536-558

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Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:536-558

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Cited by:
  1. Brauw, Alan de & Eozenou, Patrick & Gilligan, Dan & Hotz, Christine & Kumar, Neha & Meenakshi, J.V., 2013. "Biofortification, crop adoption and health information: Impact pathways in Mozambique and Uganda," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150514, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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