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The Decline in Primary School Enrolment in Kenya

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  • Arjun S. Bedi
  • Paul K. Kimalu
  • Damiano Kulundu Mandab
  • Nancy Nafula

Abstract

Since independence in 1963, Kenya has invested substantial resources in the education sector. For almost twenty-five years, these investments and other government policies led to impressive gains in educational access at all levels. However, since the mid- to late 1980s there appears to have been an erosion in educational participation and a reversal of the gains achieved in previous decades. Motivated by this trend, this paper uses temporal, cross-section and pseudo-panel data to assess the plausibility of various factors that may be responsible for the decline in primary school educational enrolment. In particular, we consider the role of school fees, school inputs and curriculum, school availability, the expected benefits of education and the spread of HIV/AIDS. We also try to identify the most effective policy interventions that may be used to prevent further declines in primary school enrolment rates. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) in its journal Journal of African Economies.

Volume (Year): 13 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 1-43

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Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:13:y:2004:i:1:p:1-43

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  1. Behrman, Jere R & Knowles, James C, 1999. "Household Income and Child Schooling in Vietnam," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 211-56, May.
  2. Bedi, Arjun S & Marshall, Jeffrey H, 1999. "School Attendance and Student Achievement: Evidence from Rural Honduras," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(3), pages 657-82, April.
  3. Gertler, Paul & Glewwe, Paul, 1990. "The willingness to pay for education in developing countries : Evidence from rural Peru," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 251-275, August.
  4. Bedi, Arjun Singh & Edwards, John H. Y., 2002. "The impact of school quality on earnings and educational returns--evidence from a low-income country," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 157-185, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Michael A. Clemens, 2004. "The Long Walk to School: International education goals in historical perspective," Development and Comp Systems 0403007, EconWPA.
  2. David K. Evans & Arkadipta Ghosh, 2008. "Prioritizing Educational Investments in Children in the Developing World," Working Papers 587, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  3. Martín Cicowiez & Luciano Di Gresia & Leonardo Gasparini, 2007. "Políticas Públicas y Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio en la Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0056, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  4. Wamuthenya, W.R., 2010. "To what extent can disparities in compositional and structural factors account for the gender gap in unemployment in the urban areas of Kenya?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 502, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  5. Rob Vos & Arjun Bedi & Paul K. Kimalu & Damiano K. Manda & Nancy N. Nafula & Mwangi S. Kimenyi, 2004. "Achieving Universal Primary Education: Can Kenya Afford it?," Working papers 2004-47, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  6. Vos, R. & Ponce, J., 2004. "Meeting the millennium development goal in education : a cost-effectiveness analysis for Ecuador," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19162, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  7. Gönsch, Iris, 2010. "Determinants of primary school enrollment in Haiti and the Dominican Republic," Discussion Papers 54, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).

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