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The diffusion of workplace voice and high-commitment human resource management practices in Britain, 1984–1998

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  • Alex Bryson
  • Rafael Gomez
  • Tobias Kretschmer
  • Paul Willman

Abstract

Workplace voice and systems of high-commitment human resource management (HCHRM) have been found to impart measurable benefits to adopting firms, yet significant numbers of establishments fail to employ such practices. This article addresses the puzzle of staggered diffusion by explicitly treating voice and HCHRM as technological innovations. Using British data, the article finds that variables highlighted in the technological diffusion literature are significant predictors of workplace voice and HCHRM adoption. Specifically, we find that (i) number of employees, (ii) size of multi-establishment network, (iii) ownership type, (iv) set-up date and (v) network effects all play a significant role in predicting where voice and HCHRM are found. We also find evidence of joint usage of workplace voice and HCHRM practices, suggesting that HCHRM is not a substitute or natural successor to voice. Copyright 2007 , Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Industrial and Corporate Change.

Volume (Year): 16 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 395-426

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Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:16:y:2007:i:3:p:395-426

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Cited by:
  1. Alex Bryson & Paul Willman & Rafael Gomez & Tobias Kretschmer, 2013. "The Comparative Advantage of Non-Union Voice in B ritain, 1980–2004," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52, pages 194-220, 01.
  2. Dr Alex Bryson, 2011. "Does High Involvement Management Improve Worker Wellbeing?," NIESR Discussion Papers 3045, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  3. Dr Alex Bryson & John Forth, 2012. "CEO Incentive Contracts in China: Why Does City Location Matter?," NIESR Discussion Papers 11165, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  4. Petri Böckerman & Alex Bryson & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2013. "Does high involvement management lead to higher pay?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(4), pages 861-885, October.
  5. YAMAMOTO Isamu & MATSUURA Toshiyuki, 2012. "Effect of Work-Life Balance Practices on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Japanese firm-level panel data," Discussion papers 12079, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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