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Payoff Effects in Information Cascade Experiments

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  • Anderson, Lisa R

Abstract

Error rates are estimated using data from "information cascade" experiments. The econometric estimation assumes a logistic error structure and error rates are compared across three experimental treatments that differ only with respect to payoff structure. In a "no payoff" treatment subjects receive a fixed payment for participating in the experiment and earnings do not vary with decisions. In "payoff" and "double payoff" treatments earnings depend on each subject's decisions. The results indicate that rewarding correct decisions reduces the amount of decision error. However, increasing the payment for a correct decision does not reduce errors over the range of payoffs considered. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 39 (2001)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 609-15

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:39:y:2001:i:4:p:609-15

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Cited by:
  1. Goeree, Jacob & Palfrey, Thomas & Rogers, Brian & McKelvey, Richard, 2004. "Self-correcting Information Cascades," Working Papers 1197, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  2. Georg Weizsacker, 2010. "Do We Follow Others When We Should? A Simple Test of Rational Expectations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2340-60, December.
  3. Tim Grebe & Julia Schmid & Andreas Stiehler, 2006. "Do Individuals Recognize Cascade Behavior of Others? - An Experimental Study -," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2006-079, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  4. Mathias Drehmann & Jörg Oechssler & Andreas Roider, 2004. "Herding with and without Payoff Externalities - An Internet Experiment," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse15_2004, University of Bonn, Germany.
  5. Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2008. "Thought and Behavior Contagion in Capital Markets," MPRA Paper 9164, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Anthony Ziegelmeyer & Frédéric Koessler & Juergen Bracht & Eyal Winter, 2010. "Fragility of information cascades: an experimental study using elicited beliefs," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 121-145, June.
  7. Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2001. "Herd Behavior and Cascading in Capital Markets: A Review and Synthesis," MPRA Paper 5186, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Morone, Andrea & Fiore, Annamaria & Sandri, Serena, 2007. "On the absorbability of herd behaviour and informational cascades: an experimental analysis," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 15/07, Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
  9. Meub, Lukas & Proeger, Till & Hüning, Hendrik, 2013. "A comparison of endogenous and exogenous timing in a social learning experiment," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 167, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.

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