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Deregulating Religion: The Economics of Church and State

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  • Iannaccone, Laurence R
  • Finke, Roger
  • Stark, Rodney

Abstract

Traditional religious research fails to recognize religion as a market phenomenon. It especially overlooks supply-side factors that shape the incentives and opportunities of religious firms, emphasizing instead demand-side shifts in the perceptions, tastes, and needs of consumers. This paper reviews the effects of government actions that alter religious supply. The authors' examples demonstrate that simple deregulation lies at the root of major religious trends and that the vitality of a religious market depends critically upon its competitiveness. Copyright 1997 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 35 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 350-64

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:35:y:1997:i:2:p:350-64

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Citations

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
  1. > Economics, Ethics, and Culture > Religion and Faith > Rational Choice Theory
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Cited by:
  1. Johnson, Noel D & Koyama, Mark, 2012. "Legal Centralization and the Birth of the Secular State," MPRA Paper 40887, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Daniel M. Hungerman, 2011. "Substitution and Stigma: Evidence on Religious Competition from the Catholic Sex-Abuse Scandal," NBER Working Papers 17589, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Muller, Nick & Gray, Jo Anna & Stone, Joe, 2010. "An Economist’s Guide to Heaven," MPRA Paper 22539, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Ran Abramitzky & Liran Einav & Oren Rigbi, 2008. "Is Hanukkah responsive to Christmas?," Discussion Papers 07-049, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  5. Hien, Josef, 2014. "The return of religion? The paradox of faith-based welfare provision in a secular age," MPIfG Discussion Paper 14/9, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
  6. Pyne, Derek Arnold, 2010. "A model of religion and death," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 46-54, January.
  7. Mookerjee, Rajen & Beron, Krista, 2005. "Gender, religion and happiness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 674-685, October.
  8. Robert Mochrie & John Sawkins & Alexander Naumov, 2008. "Competition and Participation in Religious Markets: Evidence from Victorian Scotland," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 66(4), pages 437-467.
  9. Anca Cojoc, 2010. "After the fall: the impact of government regulation on church attendance in Eastern Europe, 1990–2004," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 485-496, March.
  10. Iyer, S. & Velu, C. & Xue, J. & Chakravarty, T., 2011. "Divine Innovation: Religion and Service Provision by Religious Organizations in India," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1135, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  11. Iannaccone, Laurence R. & Haight, Colleen E. & Rubin, Jared, 2011. "Lessons from Delphi: Religious markets and spiritual capitals," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 326-338, March.
  12. Pena López, J.A. & Sanchez Santos, J.M., 2005. "Mercados de creencias versus hipótesis de la secularización: aspectos positivos y normativos/Markets of beliefs vs. scularization hupothecis: positive and normative aspects," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 23, pages 837-861, Diciembre.
  13. Migheli, Matteo, 2009. "Religiosity and happiness: an ever-winning couple? An answer from India," POLIS Working Papers 126, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
  14. Jonathan Gruber, 2005. "Religious Market Structure, Religious Participation, and Outcomes: Is Religion Good for You?," NBER Working Papers 11377, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Z A Spindler & X Vanssay, 2002. "Constitutions And Economic Freedom," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 70(6), pages 1135-1147, 09.
  16. Mariya Aleksynska & Barry Chiswick, 2013. "The determinants of religiosity among immigrants and the native born in Europe," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 563-598, December.
  17. Pyne, Derek, 2013. "An afterlife capital model of religious choice," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 32-44.
  18. Raphaël Franck & Laurence Iannaccone, 2014. "Religious decline in the 20th century West: testing alternative explanations," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 385-414, June.

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