Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Government Consumption and Growth

Contents:

Author Info

  • Evans, Paul

Abstract

Using a simple stochastic growth model that nests both exogenous and endogenous growth, this paper shows that the growth rate should be mean stationary if growth is exogenous and difference stationary if growth is endogenous and any variable affecting investment is difference stationary. Permanent changes in the share of output devoted to government consumption should permanently affect the growth rate if, and only if, growth is endogenous. The author tests these implications and finds no evidence that growth is endogenous. Furthermore, even if growth is endogenous, the evidence indicates that its degree of endogeneity is likely to be small. Copyright 1997 by Oxford University Press.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 35 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 209-17

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:35:y:1997:i:2:p:209-17

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK
Phone: 714-965-8800
Fax: 01865 267 985
Email:
Web page: http://ei.oupjournals.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Georgios Karras, 2006. "Foreign aid and long-run economic growth: empirical evidence for a panel of developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 15-28.
  2. By Michael Funke & Ralf Ruhwedel, 2001. "Product Variety and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence for the OECD Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(2), pages 1.
  3. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2013. "Political Ideology and Economic Growth: Evidence from the French Democracy," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00917617, HAL.
  4. Mark, Nelson C. & Sul, Donggyu, 2001. "Nominal exchange rates and monetary fundamentals: Evidence from a small post-Bretton woods panel," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 29-52, February.
  5. Paul Evans, 1998. "Income Dynamics in Regions and Countries," Working Papers 98-09, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Arlene Garces-Ozanne, 2006. "A bounds test approach to the study of level relationships in a panel of high-performing Asian economies (hpaes)," Working Papers 0607, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2006.
  7. Daniel G. Swaine, 1999. "Is the U.S. economy characterized by endogenous growth?: a time-series test of two stochastic growth models," Working Papers 99-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  8. Karras Georgios, 2001. "Long-Run Economic Growth In Europe: Is It Endogenous Or Neoclassical?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 63-76, June.
  9. Romero-Ávila, Diego & Strauch, Rolf, 2008. "Public finances and long-term growth in Europe: Evidence from a panel data analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 172-191, March.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:35:y:1997:i:2:p:209-17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.