Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Catholic Schools, Dropout Rates and Educational Attainment

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sander, William
  • Krautmann, Anthony C
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper examines the effect of Catholic schooling on high-school dropout rates and educational attainment. Particular attention is given to the effect of selection into the Catholic school sector. After adjusting for self-selection, the authors find that sophomores in the Catholic schools are still substantially more likely to graduate with their class. It is also shown that seniors in the Catholic schools are not more likely to acquire more schooling than other seniors if selection is taken into account. Copyright 1995 by Oxford University Press.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

    Volume (Year): 33 (1995)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 217-33

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:33:y:1995:i:2:p:217-33

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK
    Phone: 714-965-8800
    Fax: 01865 267 985
    Email:
    Web page: http://ei.oupjournals.org/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Tobias, Justin L., 2002. "Model uncertainty and race and gender heterogeneity in the college entry decision," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 211-219, June.
    2. Mocan, Naci & Scafidi, Benjamin & Tekin, Erdal, 2002. "Catholic Schools and Bad Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 599, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Berkowitz, Daniel & Hoekstra, Mark, 2011. "Does high school quality matter? Evidence from admissions data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 280-288, April.
    4. Derek Neal, 1994. "The Effect of Catholic Secondary Schooling on Educational Attainment," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 95, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    5. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Sander, William, 2008. "Religion, religiosity and private school choice: Implications for estimating the effectiveness of private schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 85-100, July.
    6. Sander, William, 1999. "Endogenous expenditures and student achievement," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 223-231, August.
    7. Betts, Julian R. & Fairlie, Robert W., 2003. "Does immigration induce 'native flight' from public schools into private schools?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 987-1012, May.
    8. Danny Cohen Zada, 2007. "An Alternative Instrument for Private School Competition," Working Papers 0705, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    9. Danny Cohen-Zada & Todd Elder, 2012. "Religious Pluralism, Religious Market Shares and the Demand for Religious Schooling," Working Papers 1201, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    10. Cohen-Zada, Danny, 2006. "Preserving religious identity through education: Economic analysis and evidence from the US," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 372-398, November.
    11. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Elder, Todd, 2009. "Historical religious concentrations and the effects of Catholic schooling," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 65-74, July.
    12. H. Naci Mocan & Erdal Tekin, 2002. "Catholic Schools and Bad Behavior: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis," NBER Working Papers 9172, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Arestoff, Florence & Bommier, Antoine, 2001. "Efficacité relative des écoles publiques et privées à Madagascar : étude d’une période de restriction budgétaire," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/1956, Paris Dauphine University.
    14. Thomas S. Dee & William N. Evans & Sheila E. Murray, 1999. "Data Watch: Research Data in the Economics of Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 205-216, Summer.
    15. Kim, Young-Joo, 2011. "Catholic schools or school quality? The effects of Catholic schools on labor market outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 546-558, June.
    16. Billger, Sherrilyn M., 2009. "On reconstructing school segregation: The efficacy and equity of single-sex schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 393-402, June.
    17. D. N. Figlio & J. A. Stone, . "School Choice and Student Performance: Are Private Schools Really Better?," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1141-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:33:y:1995:i:2:p:217-33. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.