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Financialisation, income distribution and aggregate demand in the USA

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  • �zlem Onaran
  • Engelbert Stockhammer
  • Lucas Grafl

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of financialisation and functional income distribution on aggregate demand in the USA by estimating the effects of the increase in rentier income (dividends and interest payments) and housing and financial wealth on consumption and investment. The redistribution of income in favour of profits suppresses consumption, whereas the increase in the rentier income and wealth has positive effects. A higher rentier income decreases investment. Without the wealth effects, the overall effect of the changes in distribution on aggregate demand would have been negative. Thus a pro-capital income distribution leads to a slightly negative effect on growth, i.e. the USA economy is moderately wage-led. Copyright The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 35 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 637-661

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Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:35:y:2011:i:4:p:637-661

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Cited by:
  1. Hein, Eckhard, 2011. "Finance-dominated capitalism, re-distribution, household debt and financial fragility in a Kaleckian distribution and growth model," IPE Working Papers 11/2011, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
  2. Thomas Goda & Photis Lysandrou, 2011. "The contribution of wealth concentration to the subprime crisis: a quantitative estimation," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 010718, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
  3. Eckhard Hein & Nina Dodig, 2014. "Financialisation, distribution, growth and crises – long-run tendencies," Working papers wpaper23, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
  4. Deepankar Basu, 2011. "Financialization, Household Credit and Economic Slowdown in the U.S," Working Papers wp261, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  5. Deepankar Basu, 2011. "Comparative Growth Dynamics in a Discrete-time Marxian Circuit of Capital Model," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-12, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  6. Olivier Allain, 2011. "The impact of income distribution on consumption: a reassessment," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00712657, HAL.
  7. Jochen Hartwig, 2013. "Ist Lohnzurückhaltung gut oder schlecht für das Schweizer Wirtschaftswachstum?," KOF Analysen, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich, vol. 7(2), pages 33-45, June.
  8. Eckhard Hein & Nina Dodig & Natalia Budyldina, 2014. "Financial, economic and social systems: French Regulation School, Social Structures of Accumulation and Post-Keynesian approaches compared," Working papers wpaper22, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
  9. Hein, Eckhard, 2011. "Distribution, ‘Financialisation’ and the Financial and Economic Crisis – Implications for Post-crisis Economic Policies," MPRA Paper 31180, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Robert A. Blecker, 2013. "Economic Stagnation in the United States: Underlying Causes and Global Consequences," Working Papers 2013-16, American University, Department of Economics.
  11. Christian A. Belabed & Thomas Theobald & Till van Treeck, 2013. "Income Distribution and Current Account Imbalances," IMK Working Paper 126-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  12. Esteban Perez Caldentey & Matias Vernengo, 2013. "Wage and Profit-led Growth: The Limits to Neo-Kaleckian Models and a Kaldorian Proposal," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_775, Levy Economics Institute.
  13. Mark Setterfield & Yun Kim, 2013. "Debt Servicing, Aggregate Consumption, and Growth," Working Papers 1316, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  14. Eugenio Caverzasi, 2012. "From the Financial Instability Hypothesis to the theory of Capital Market Inflation: a structural interpretation of the sub-prime crisis," DEM Working Papers Series 018, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
  15. Jan Behringer & Till van Treeck, 2013. "Income distribution and current account: A sectoral perspective," IMK Working Paper 125-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  16. Herr, Hansjörg & Horn, Gustav A, 2012. "Wage policy today," ILO Working Papers 471360, International Labour Organization.
  17. Jochen Hartwig, 2014. "Testing the Bhaduri-Marglin Model with OECD Panel Data," KOF Working papers 14-349, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  18. Eugenio Caverzasi & Antoine Godin, 2013. "Stock-flow Consistent Modeling through the Ages," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_745, Levy Economics Institute.

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