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Care regimes and national employment models

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  • Annamaria Simonazzi

Abstract

Rapid population ageing has dramatically increased the social and economic cost of elderly care. Demand for care labour is increasing rapidly, and all countries are experiencing problems in recruiting enough workers to meet demand. In some countries, the shortage of care workers has been met by a large inflow of immigrant, mostly female, workers. The paper’s aim is twofold. To argue that the way in which care is provided and financed may entail large differences in the creation of a formal care market. Provision in kind and ‘tied’ monetary transfers - that is, cash benefits that are somehow regulated – may prevent the formation of a large informal care market. National employment models in turn shape the features of the care labour market: in fact, they affect the quantity and the quality of the care labour supply, the size of the care labour shortage, and the degree of dependence on migrant carers. We show how these two factors combine to shape the characteristics of care regimes and their long term sustainability.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 33 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 211-232

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Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:33:y:2009:i:2:p:211-232

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  1. Arntz, Melanie & Sacchetto, Ralf & Spermann, Alexander & Steffes, Susanne & Widmaier, Sarah, 2007. "The German Social Long-Term Care Insurance: Structure and Reform Options," IZA Discussion Papers 2625, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Melanie Arntz & Jochen Michaelis & Alexander Spermann, 2006. "Reforming Long-term Care in Germany," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(V), pages 37-42.
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Cited by:
  1. Bruno Palier & Clément Carbonnier & Michaël Zemmour, 2014. "Tax cuts or social investment? Evaluating the opportunity cost of the French employment strategy," Sciences Po publications 31, Sciences Po.
  2. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore, 2009. "Le cause del(l)'(in)successo lavorativo dei giovani," Economia & Lavoro, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini, issue 3, pages 107.
  3. Francesca Bettio & Giovanni Solinas, 2009. "Which European model for elderly care? Equity and cost-effectiveness in home based care in three European countries," Department of Economics 0609, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
  4. Franck Bailly & François-Xavier Devetter & François Horn, 2012. "Est-il possible d'améliorer les conditions de travail et d'emploi dans le secteur des services à la personne ? Une analyse en termes de mondes de production," Post-Print halshs-00805678, HAL.
  5. Pastore, Francesco & Tenaglia, Simona, 2013. "Ora et non Labora? A Test of the Impact of Religion on Female Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 7356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Rania Antonopoulos, 2013. "Expanding Social Protection in Developing Countries: A Gender Perspective," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_757, Levy Economics Institute.
  7. Kotsadam, Andreas, 2009. "Effects of informal eldercare on female labor supply in different European welfare states," Working Papers in Economics 353, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  8. Angermann, Annette & Eichhorst, Werner, 2013. "Who Cares for You at Home? Personal and Household Services in Europe," IZA Policy Papers 71, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Angermann, Annette & Eichhorst, Werner, 2012. "Report No. 45: Unterstützende Dienstleistungen für ältere Menschen im europäischen Vergleich," IZA Research Reports 45, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. M. Lippi Bruni & C. Ugolini, 2013. "Delegating home care for the elderly to external caregivers? An empirical study on Italian data," Working Papers wp905, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

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