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Managing Urban Deer

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  • Daniel Rondeau
  • Jon M. Conrad

Abstract

Conflicts are emerging between humans and wildlife populations adaptable to the high density of humans found in urban and suburban areas. In response to these threats, animal control programs are typically designed with the objective of establishing and maintaining a stable population. This article challenges this view by studying the management of urban deer in Irondequoit, NY. Pulsing controls can be more efficient than steady-state regimes under a wide range of conditions in both deterministic and stochastic environments, but potential gains can be dissipated by management constraints. The effect of citizen opposition to lethal control methods is also investigated. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 85 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 266-281

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:85:y:2003:i:1:p:266-281

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Cited by:
  1. Xie, Fang & Horan, Richard D., 2009. "Disease and Behavioral Dynamics for Brucellosis Control in Elk and Cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51707, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Fenichel, Eli P. & Horan, Richard D. & Wolf, Christopher A., 2004. "The Role Of Sexual Dimorphism In The Economics Of Wildlife Disease Management," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20395, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Ward, Kelly John, 2005. "Reducing Deer Overabundance by Distinguishing High-productivity Hunters: Revealed-Preference, Incentive-Compatible Licensing Mechanisms," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19281, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  4. Horan, Richard D. & Wolf, Christopher A. & Fenichel, Eli P. & Mathews, Kenneth H., Jr., 2004. "Controlling Wildlife And Livestock Disease With Endogenous On-Farm Biosecurity," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20349, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  5. Fischer, Carolyn & Sterner, Thomas & Muchapondwa, Edwin, 2005. "Bioeconomic Model of Community Incentives for Wildlife Management Before and After CAMPFIRE," Discussion Papers dp-05-06, Resources For the Future.
  6. Rollins, Kimberly S. & Heigh, Lori & Kanetkar, Vinay, 2004. "Net Costs of Wildlife Damage on Private Lands," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(03), December.
  7. Carolyn Fischer & Edwin Muchapondwa & Thomas Sterner, 2011. "A Bio-Economic Model of Community Incentives for Wildlife Management Under CAMPFIRE," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 48(2), pages 303-319, February.
  8. Horan, Richard D. & Wolf, Christopher A., 2003. "The Economics Of Managing Wildlife Disease," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22224, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  9. Richard Horan & Erwin Bulte, 2004. "Optimal and Open Access Harvesting of Multi-Use Species in a Second-Best World," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(3), pages 251-272, July.
  10. Xie, Fang & Horan, Richard D., 2008. "Disease and Behavioral Dynamics for Brucellosis in Elk and Cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6404, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  11. Koji Kotani & Makoto Kakinaka & Hiroyuki Matsuda, 2006. "Dynamic Economic Analysis on Invasive Species Management: Some Policy Implications of Catchability," Working Papers EMS_2006_16, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
  12. Koji Kotani & Makoto Kakinaka & Hiroyuki Matsuda, 2008. "Optimal Escapement Levels on Renewable Resource Management under Process Uncertainty: Some Implications of Convex Unit Harvest Cost," Working Papers EMS_2008_05, Research Institute, International University of Japan.

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