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Mother's Nutrition Knowledge and Children's Dietary Intakes

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Author Info

  • Jayachandran N. Variyam
  • James Blaylock
  • Biing-Hwan Lin
  • Katherine Ralston
  • David Smallwood

Abstract

This article uses U.S. food consumption data to examine the effect of maternal nutrition knowledge on the dietary intakes of children between two and seventeen years of age. Results show that maternal knowledge influences children's diets and that such influence decreases as children grow older. Nutrition knowledge acts as a pathway through which maternal education influences children's diets. This finding supports the hypothesis that education affects health-related choices by raising the allocative efficiency of health input use. The results suggest that nutrition education may be more effective if targeted both toward mothers with young children and directly toward school-age children. Copyright 1999, Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1244588
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 81 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 373-384

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:81:y:1999:i:2:p:373-384

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Cited by:
  1. Kathryn Anderson & James Foster & David Frisvold, 2004. "Investing in Health: The Long-Term Impact of Head Start," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0426, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  2. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Yen, Steven T., 2005. "Consumer Knowledge, Food Label Use and Grain Consumption," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19557, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Yen, Steven T. & Lin, Biing-Hwan & Davis, Christopher G., 2008. "Consumer knowledge and meat consumption at home and away from home," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 631-639, December.
  4. Angela Fertig & Gerhard Glomm & Rusty Tchernis, 2009. "The connection between maternal employment and childhood obesity: inspecting the mechanisms," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 227-255, September.
  5. Bonanno, Alessandro & Goetz, Stephan J., 2012. "Food Store Density, Nutrition Education, Eating Habits and Obesity," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 15(4).
  6. Steven Block, 2003. "Nutrition Knowledge, Household Coping, and the Demand for Micronutrient-Rich Foods," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 20, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
  7. Carlson, Andrea & Senauer, Benjamin, 1999. "Determinants Of The Health Of American Preschool Children: Estimated Health Demand And Production Functions," Working Papers 14406, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
  8. Wendt, Minh & Kinsey, Jean D., 2009. "Childhood Overweight and School Outcomes," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49347, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  9. Chang, Hung-Hao & Nayga Jr., Rodolfo M., 2011. "Mother's nutritional label use and children's body weight," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 171-178, April.
  10. Rimal, Arbindra & Balasubramanian, Siva K. & Moon, Wanki, 2004. "Two-Stage Decision Model Of Soy Food Consumption Behavior," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20096, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  11. Steven Block, 2004. "Maternal Nutrition Knowledge and the Demand for Micronutrient-Rich Foods: Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(6), pages 82-105.
  12. Chen, S. & Shogren, Jason F. & Orazem, Peter, 2002. "Prices and Health: Identifying the Effects of Nutrition, Exercise, and Medication Choices on Blood Pressure," Staff General Research Papers 5059, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Wendt, Minh, 2008. "Economic, Environmental, and Endowment Effects on Childhood Obesity," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6571, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  14. Everett B. Peterson & Edward Van Eenoo & Anya McGuirk & Paul V. Preckel, 2001. "Perceptions of fat content in meat products," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 437-453.

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