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International Comparisons of Cattle Cycles

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  • Yair Mundlak
  • He Huang

Abstract

The time-series properties of cattle production in three countries with different technologies, Argentina, the United States, and Uruguay, are studied in order to shed light on the role of technology in the dynamics of the cattle sector. Four series are analyzed for each country, slaughter, price, stock of cows, and total herd. Spectral decomposition of the time series shows the existence of cycles having surprising regularity for all the four time series. The three countries exhibit very similar cyclicities in spite of their different technologies and economic environment. Copyright 1996, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 78 (1996)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 855-868

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:78:y:1996:i:4:p:855-868

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Cited by:
  1. Aadland, David, 2002. "Cattle Cycles, Expectations And The Age Distribution Of Capital," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19795, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  2. Yeboah, Osei-Agyeman & Ofori-Boadu, Victor & Salifou, Samaila, 2009. "A Foot and Mouth Disease Induced Model of US Excess Supply of Beef," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46053, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  3. Francis X. Diebold & Lee E. Ohanian & Jeremy Berkowitz, 1997. "Dynamic equilibrium economies: a framework for comparing models and data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-23, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. David Aadland, . "The economics of cattle supply," Working Papers 2000-11, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  5. Chavas, Jean-Paul, 2000. "On information and market dynamics: The case of the U.S. beef market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(5-7), pages 833-853, June.
  6. Omar Enrique Castillo Nuñez, 2008. "Comportamiento de los precios del ganado hembra de levante de primera clase en Montería y Sincelejo (Colombia)," REVISTA FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS ECONÓMICAS, UNIVERSIDAD MILITAR NUEVA GRANADA.
  7. Chen, Shu-Ling & Jackson, John D. & Kim, Hyeongwoo & Resiandini, Pramesti, 2012. "What Drives Commodity Prices?," MPRA Paper 40711, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Rezitis, Anthony N. & Stavropoulos, Konstantinos S., 2010. "Modeling beef supply response and price volatility under CAP reforms: The case of Greece," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 163-174, April.
  9. Aadland, David & Bailey, DeeVon & Feng, Shelly, 2000. "A Theoretical And Empirical Investigation Of The Supply Response In The U.S. Beef-Cattle Industry," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21887, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  10. Riley, John Michael & Williams, Brian R., 2013. "Cow-Calf Industry Expansion on the Horizon? Market Signals vs. Outside Factors," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 143044, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  11. Mathews, Kenneth H., Jr. & Short, Sara D., 2001. "The Beef Cow Replacement Decision," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 19(2).
  12. David Aadland, 2001. "Cattle Cycles, Heterogeneous Expectations and the Age Distribution of Capital," Working Papers 2002-02, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Mbaga, Msafiri Daudi & Coyle, Barry T., 2003. "Beef Supply Response Under Uncertainty: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Model," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(03), December.

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