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The Rate Of Time Preference, Seat Location Choice And Student Performance In The Classroom

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  • Wisdom Akpalu
  • Richard Vogel
  • Xu Zhang
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    Abstract

    Recent research on the impact of seat location preferences in classes on student performance has yielded conflicting and very divergent results. This study contributes to this strand of literature by controlling for additional variables that could affect student performance. Specifically, in addition to seating location preferences, we propose that student performance may be affected by the rate at which the student values present rewards as opposed to future rewards, self perceived risk aversion, absenteeism, environmental factors and other personal attributes. Using students' final numerical course grades across a sample of economics courses at Farmingdale State College we have found that innate ability measured by cumulative gpa, hours of study before examination, and age affect grades obtained based on a stochastic production function estimation. Furthermore, attendance, the number of semesters at the college, laptop usage in class, perceived risk-aversion, and residency status affect technical efficiency scores. Finally, attendance and age of the student affect seat location preferences.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by New York State Economics Association (NYSEA) in its journal New York Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 43 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 33-45

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    Handle: RePEc:nye:nyervw:v:43:y:2012:i:1:p:33-45

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    1. Elchanan Cohn & Eric Johnson, 2006. "Class Attendance and Performance in Principles of Economics," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 211-233.
    2. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
    3. Kumbhakar, Subal C. & Tsionas, Efthymios G., 2006. "Estimation of stochastic frontier production functions with input-oriented technical efficiency," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 71-96, July.
    4. J J Arias & Douglas M. Walker, 2004. "Additional Evidence on the Relationship between Class Size and Student Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 311-329, October.
    5. M. Ryan Haley & Marianne F. Johnson & M. Kevin McGee, 2010. "A Framework for Reconsidering the Lake Wobegon Effect," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 95-109, March.
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