Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Effects of the Earned Income Credit on the Seasonality of Household Expenditures

Contents:

Author Info

  • Barrow, Lisa
  • McGranahan, Leslie

Abstract

Using data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, we investigate whether the Earned Income Credit (EIC) leads to changes in seasonal expenditure patterns of low-income workers. We find that EIC eligible households spend approximately 3 percent more total during February, the modal month of EIC refunds, and 9 percent more on durable goods than non-eligible households. The increased spending on durable goods indicates that the EIC facilitates the purchasing of big-ticket items by low-income families. These estimates, when converted to dollars, also suggest that EIC recipients smooth expenditure somewhat since the average increase in expenditure is less than the average EIC refund.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/53/4/ntj-v53n04p1211-44-effects-earned-income-credit.pdf
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/53/4/ntj-v53n04p1211-44-effects-earned-income-credit.html
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by National Tax Association in its journal National Tax Journal.

Volume (Year): 53 (2000)
Issue (Month): n. 4 (December)
Pages: 1211-44

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:53:y:2000:i:n._4:p:1211-44

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 725 15th St. NW #600. Washington, D.C. 20005-2109
Phone: (202)737-3325
Fax: (202) 737-7308
Email:
Web page: http://www.ntanet.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Boyd-Swan, Casey & Herbst, Chris M. & Ifcher, John & Zarghamee, Homa, 2013. "The Earned Income Tax Credit, Health, and Happiness," IZA Discussion Papers 7261, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Jesus Fernández-Villaverde & Dirk Krueger, 2007. "Consumption over the Life Cycle: Facts from Consumer Expenditure Survey Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 552-565, August.
  3. Richard Hawkins & Sally Wallace, 2006. "Source of income effects for demand decisions and taxable consumption," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(20), pages 2371-2379.
  4. H. Shaefer & Xiaoqing Song & Trina Williams Shanks, 2013. "Do single mothers in the United States use the Earned Income Tax Credit to reduce unsecured debt?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 659-680, December.
  5. Daniel Aaronson & Sumit Agarwal & Eric French, 2008. "The consumption response to minimum wage increases," Working Paper Series WP-07-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  6. Laura Leete & Neil Bania, 2010. "The effect of income shocks on food insufficiency," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 505-526, December.
  7. Neil Bania & Laura Leete, 2009. "Monthly household income volatility in the U.S., 1991/92 vs. 2002/03," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(3), pages 2100-2112.
  8. McGranahan, Leslie & Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore, 2013. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Food Consumption Patterns," Working Paper Series WP-2013-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  9. Hilary W. Hoynes & Douglas L. Miller & David Simon, 2012. "Income, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and Infant Health," NBER Working Papers 18206, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Andrew Weinbach & Rodney Paul, 2008. "Running the Numbers on Lotteries and the Poor: An Empirical Analysis of Transfer Payment Distribution and Subsequent Lottery Sales," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(3), pages 333-344, September.
  11. Mike Brewer, 2001. "Comparing in-work benefits and the reward to work for families with children in the US and the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 22(1), pages 41-77, January.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:53:y:2000:i:n._4:p:1211-44. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Charmaine Wright).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.