Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Distributional Implications of Social Security Reform for the Elderly: The Impact of Revising COLAs, the Normal Retirement Age, and the Taxation of Benefits

Contents:

Author Info

  • Johnson, Richard W.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Several reform plans have been proposed to reduce the financial strain on Social Security. Many proposals under consideration, however, would exacerbate the inequality of income among the elderly. Using data from the Current Population Survey, this paper finds that reducing cost-of-living escalators, even when the reforms are designed to protect low-income beneficiaries, would generally worsen inequality over time and increase the number of elders with income below the poverty level. Raising the retirement age would generate similar results. However, increasing taxes on retirement benefits would improve the financial outlook for Social Security without imposing additional hardships on the poorest elderly.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/52/3/ntj-v52n03p505-30-distributional-implications-social-security.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/52/3/ntj-v52n03p505-30-distributional-implications-social-security.html
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by National Tax Association in its journal National Tax Journal.

    Volume (Year): 52 (1999)
    Issue (Month): n. 3 (September)
    Pages: 505-30

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:52:y:1999:i:n._3:p:505-30

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 725 15th St. NW #600. Washington, D.C. 20005-2109
    Phone: (202)737-3325
    Fax: (202) 737-7308
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.ntanet.org/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Julia Lynn Coronado & Don Fullerton & Thomas Glass, 1999. "Distributional Impacts of Proposed Changes to the Social Security System," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, volume 13, pages 149-186 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Panis, C.W.A. & Lillard, L.A., 1996. "Socioeconomic Differentials in the Returns to Social Security," Papers 96-05, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    3. Steven Caldwell & Melissa Favreault & Alla Gantman & Jagadeesh Gokhale & Thomas Johnson, 1998. "Social Security's Treatment of Postwar Americans," NBER Working Papers 6603, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Wade Pfau, 2004. "The Impact of a Social Security Cost-of-Living Adjustment Reduction on the Income Distribution of the Elderly in the United States," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 694, Econometric Society.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:52:y:1999:i:n._3:p:505-30. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Charmaine Wright).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.