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Can we use NEG models to predict migration flows? An example of CEE accession countries

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Author Info

  • D’Artis Kancs

    ()
    (London School of Economics, London, UK)

Abstract

In this paper I develop an analytically solvable and structur-ally estimable economic geography model and apply it to predict migration flows for the period following the CEE's integration with the EU. The main innovation of my ap-proach is that it endogenises both, explanatory variables and the migration rate. Model's parameters are estimated econometrically using a structural equation, which is de-rived entirely from the theoretical NEG model. My empirical findings advocate that there is enough evidence to predict a selective migration among the three Baltic States. However, labour mobility in the Baltic countries is sufficiently low to make the swift emergence of a core-periphery pattern very unlikely at this geographical level.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Transnational Press London, UK in its journal Migration Letters.

Volume (Year): 2 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 32-63

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Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:2:y:2005:i:1:p:32-63

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Related research

Keywords: Migration ; Economic Geography ; European regions ; Agglomeration;

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References

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  1. Michael Fertig, 2001. "The economic impact of EU-enlargement: assessing the migration potential," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 707-720.
  2. d’Artis Kancs & Julda Kielyte, 2002. "Migration in the Enlarged European Union: Empirical Evidence for Labour Mobility in the Baltic States," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2002_04, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  3. Krugman, Paul & Venables, Anthony J., 1994. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," CEPR Discussion Papers 1015, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M, 2001. "First- and Second-Generation Migrants in Germany - What Do We Know and What Do People Think," CEPR Discussion Papers 2803, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/10191 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2004. "The Empirics of Agglomeration and Trade," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/10191, Sciences Po.
  7. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. De New, John P & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1994. "Native Wage Impacts of Foreign Labor: A Random Effects Panel Analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 177-92.
  9. Phillip B. Levine & David J. Zimmerman, 1995. "An Empirical Analysis of the Welfare Magnet Debate Using the NLSY," NBER Working Papers 5264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Bauer, Thomas K., 1999. "Occupational Mobility of Ethnic Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 58, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Zaka Ratsimalahelo, 2001. "Rank Test Based On Matrix Perturbation Theory," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2001_04, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  12. repec:fth:iniesr:430 is not listed on IDEAS
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Anderson, James, 2011. "Migration of Labor in Europe. Theory and Evidence," Working Papers of Institute for Economic Forecasting 110427, Institute for Economic Forecasting.
  2. Rafael González-Val & Daniel A. Tirado Fabregat & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2013. "Market potential and city growth : Spain 1860-1960," Working Papers in Economic History wp13-04, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  3. Chen, Xi & Zhou, Bin & Zhong, Funing, 2010. "Do Consumers Really Care about Genetically Modified (GM) Food Label? What Do We Know? What Else Should We Know?," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels, vol. 53(2), pages 32-56.
  4. d'Artis Kancs & Julda Kielyte, 2010. "Education in the East, Emigrating to the West?," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2010_01, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  5. Ana Paula Martins, 2010. "Splitting Games: Nash Equilibrium and the Optimisation Problem," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels, vol. 53(1), pages 1-28.
  6. d'Artis Kancs & Julia Kielyte, 2010. "European Integration and Labour Migration," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2010_27, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  7. James Anderson, 2001. "Migration, FDI, and the Margins of Trade," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2001_05, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.

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