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The Russian-Ukrainian Political Divide

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  • Amelie F. Constant
  • Martin Kahanec
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

Abstract

The Orange Revolution unveiled significant political and economic tensions between ethnic Russians and Ukrainians in Ukraine. Whether this divide was caused by purely ethnic differences or by ethnically segregated reform preferences is unknown. Analysis using unique micro data collected prior to the revolution finds that voting preferences for the forces of the forthcoming Orange Revolution were strongly driven by preferences for political and economic reforms but were also independently significantly affected by ethnicity, specifically, language and nationality. Russian speakers, as opposed to Ukrainian speakers, were significantly less likely to vote for the Orange Revolution, and nationality had similar effects.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. in its journal Eastern European Economics.

Volume (Year): 49 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 (November)
Pages: 97-109

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Handle: RePEc:mes:eaeuec:v:49:y:2011:i:6:p:97-109

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Web page: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/link.asp?target=journal&id=106044

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References

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  1. H. Lehmann & N. Pignatti & J. Wadsworth, 2005. "The Incidence and Cost of Job Loss in the Ukrainian Labor Market," Working Papers 545, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  2. Amelie F. Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2012. "The Russian–Ukrainian earnings divide," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(1), pages 1-35, 01.
  3. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2000. "Political support for reforms: Economics of voting in transition countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1491-1513, August.
  4. Ganguli, Ina & Terrell, Katherine, 2006. "Institutions, markets and men's and women's wage inequality: Evidence from Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 200-227, June.
  5. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2004. "Returns to Schooling in Russia and Ukraine: A Semiparametric Approach to Cross-Country Comparative Analysis," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 719, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Kapstein, Ethan B. & Milanovic, Branko, 2000. "Dividing the spoils - pensions, privatization, and reform in Russia's transition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2292, The World Bank.
  7. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "The Absence of the African-American Owned Business: An Analysis of the Dynamics of Self-Employment," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt49c4n0fg, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  8. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Winners and Losers in Russia's Economic Transition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1094-1116, December.
  9. Robert W. Fairlie, 2003. "An Extension of the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Technique to Logit and Probit Models," Working Papers 873, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Brück, Tilman & Danzer, Alexander M. & Muravyev, Alexander & Weißhaar, Natalia, 2007. "Determinants of Poverty during Transition: Household Survey Evidence from Ukraine," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Göttingen 2007 33, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  2. Muravyev, Alexander & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2010. "Can State Language Policies Distort Students' Demand for Higher Education?," IZA Discussion Papers 5411, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Martin Kahanec & Anzelika Zaiceva, 2009. "Labor market outcomes of immigrants and non-citizens in the EU: An East-West comparison," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1/2), pages 97-115, May.
  4. Brück, Tilman & Danzer, Alexander M. & Muravyev, Alexander & Weisshaar, Natalia, 2010. "Poverty during transition: Household survey evidence from Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 123-145, June.

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