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Double Liability and Bank Risk Taking

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  • Grossman, Richard S

Abstract

This paper examines double liability as it existed in the United States prior to the Great Depression and assesses its impact upon bank risk-taking. Under double liability shareholders of failing banks could lose, in addition to the initial purchase price of shares, an amount equal to the par value of shares owned. This paper assesses whether or not banks chartered in states with double liability laws undertook less risk than banks operating under conventional limited liability. The results suggest that double liability did reduce bank risk-taking, but did not guarantee bank stability in times of widespread financial distress.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Blackwell Publishing in its journal Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.

Volume (Year): 33 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 143-59

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Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:33:y:2001:i:2:p:143-59

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-2879

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Cited by:
  1. Kenneth Spong & Kristen Regehr, 2012. "Kansas banking in the 1930s: the deposit insurance choice and implications for public policy," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III.
  2. Philipp Ager & Fabrizio Spargoli, 2013. "Bank Deregulation, Competition and Economic Growth: The US Free Banking Experience," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-210/IV/DSF69, Tinbergen Institute.
  3. Kris James Mitchener, 2004. "Bank Supervision, Regulation, and Instability During the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 10475, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ralf Ewert & Rainer Niemann, 2010. "Limited Liability, Asymmetric Taxation, and Risk Taking - Why Partial Tax Neutralities can be Harmful," CESifo Working Paper Series 3301, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Camille Cornand & Céline Gimet, 2012. "The 2007-2008 financial crisis: Is there evidence of disaster myopia?," Post-Print halshs-00617127, HAL.
  6. Camille Cornand & Céline Gimet, 2011. "The 2007-2008 financial crisis : Is there evidence of disaster myopia ?," Working Papers 1125, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  7. Mitchener, Kris James & Richardson, Gary, 2013. "Does “skin in the game” reduce risk taking? Leverage, liability and the long-run consequences of new deal banking reforms," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 508-525.
  8. Eugene N. White, 2011. "“To Establish a More Effective Supervision of Banking”: How the Birth of the Fed Altered Bank Supervision," NBER Working Papers 16825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Eugene N. White, 2009. "Lessons from the Great American Real Estate Boom and Bust of the 1920s," NBER Working Papers 15573, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Acheson, Graeme G. & Turner, John D., 2008. "The death blow to unlimited liability in Victorian Britain: The City of Glasgow failure," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 235-253, July.
  11. Richard S. Grossman, 2006. "Other People’s Money: The Evolution of Bank Capital in the Industrialized World," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2006-020, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  12. Richard S. Grossman & Masami Imai, 2011. "Contingent Capital and Bank Risk-Taking among British Banks before World War I," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2011-003, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  13. Finn Poschmann, 2014. "Shareholder Liability: A New (Old) Way of Thinking about Financial Regulation," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 401, February.
  14. Admati, Anat R. & Pfleiderer, Paul, 2009. "Increased-Liability Equity: A Proposal to Improve Capital Regulation of Large Financial Institutions," Research Papers 2043, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  15. Turner, John D., 2014. "Financial history and financial economics," QUCEH Working Paper Series 14-03, Queen's University Centre for Economic History, Queen's University Belfast.
  16. Kris James Mitchener, 2006. "Are Prudential Supervision and Regulation Pillars of Financial Stability? Evidence from the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 12074, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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