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Parents’ income and children’s school drop-out at 16 in England and Wales: evidence from the 1970 British Cohort Study

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  • Massimiliano Bratti

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Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of parents’ income on children’s drop-out from school at age 16 using data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). Unlike previous papers using the same data set, we use a continuous measure of income derived from the grouped income variable available in the BCS70, we employ instrumental variable techniques to address the issue of endogeneity of family income and take account of the potential endogeneity of income response with respect to a child’s education by jointly modelling the school drop-out decision and response to the family income question. Our estimates show the exogeneity of response to the income question with a child’s education and are in line with the previous literature finding a statistically significant small negative effect of family income on school drop-out at 16. On the contrary, other non-pecuniary parental effects, such as parental education and social class, turn out to be both significant and of a sizeable magnitude. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

Volume (Year): 5 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 15-40

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Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:5:y:2007:i:1:p:15-40

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

Related research

Keywords: BCS70; Children; Education; Family income; School drop-out; I20; J24;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Regina Riphahn & Florian Schieferdecker, 2012. "The transition to tertiary education and parental background over time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 635-675, January.

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