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Child-Care Choices by Working Mothers: The Case of Italy

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  • Daniela Del Boca

    ()

  • Marilena Locatelli

    ()

  • Daniela Vuri

    ()

Abstract

In spite of relatively generous public subsidies and a reputation for high quality, only a very limited proportion of Italian families use public child-care and a large proportion use informal care. In this paper, we attempt to explore the determinants of the use of child-care among dual workers families. Given the limitations of data available we match two different data sets: the Bank of Italy (SHIW) and ISTAT Multiscopo. We find evidence that the availability of public child-care affects in an important way its demand. We also find that increases in costs of public child-care reduce the use of public as well as private indicating a shift to informal child-care. The presence of a grandmother who lives near and is in good health is an important explanation of the choice especially in presence of very small children. An understanding of the importance of these factors is relevant in the evaluation of child-care policies. This is particularly important in Italy, where the majority of families with children have only one child and children would benefit also from the socialization aspects of the child-care system. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

Volume (Year): 3 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 453-477

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Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:3:y:2005:i:4:p:453-477

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

Related research

Keywords: working mothers; child-care; J2; C3; D1;

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References

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  1. repec:fth:coluec:9899-01 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Danièle Meulders & Jérôme De Henau & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai, 2006. "The childcare triad? indicators assessing three fields of child policies towards working mothers in the EU-15," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/7724, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Dehejia, R.H. & Wahba, S., 1998. "Propensity Score Matching Methods for Non-Experimental Causal Studies," Discussion Papers, Columbia University, Department of Economics 1998_02, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  4. Wrohlich, Katharina, 2005. "The Excess Demand for Subsidized Child Care in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1515, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Viitanen, Tarja K & Arnaud Chevalier, 2003. "The Supply of Childcare in Britain: Do Mothers Queue for Childcare?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003, Royal Economic Society 211, Royal Economic Society.
  6. Maria Chiuri, 2000. "Quality and Demand of Child Care and Female Labour Supply in Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, CEIS, vol. 14(1), pages 97-118, 03.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Concetta Rondinelli & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco Billari, 2010. "Women´s wages and childbearing decisions: Evidence from Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(19), pages 549-578, April.
  2. Giacomo De Giorgi & Marco Paccagnella & Michele Pellizzari, 2013. "Gender complementarities in the labor market," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 183, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  3. Orman, Cuneyt & Goksel, Turkmen & Gurdal, Mehmet Y, 2011. "The Baby Boom, Baby Busts, and Grandmothers," MPRA Paper 28782, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Mayssun El-Attar, 2013. "Trust, child care technology choice and female labor force participation," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 507-544, December.
  5. Christina Boll & Julian Leppin & Nora Reich, 2014. "Paternal childcare and parental leave policies: evidence from industrialized countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 129-158, March.
  6. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "Children, Kitchen, Church: does ethnicity matter?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 83-103, March.
  7. Coneus, Katja & Goeggel, Kathrin & Muehler, Grit, 2007. "Determinants of Child Care Participation," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-074, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2006-06 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. María Suárez, 2013. "Working mothers’ decisions on childcare: the case of Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 545-561, December.
  10. Brilli, Ylenia & Del Boca, Daniela & Pronzato, Chiara D., 2011. "Exploring the Impacts of Public Childcare on Mothers and Children in Italy: Does Rationing Play a Role?," IZA Discussion Papers 5918, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Ylenia Brilli & Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini, 2013. "Child Care Arrangements: Determinants and Consequences," CHILD Working Papers Series, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA 18, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
  12. Edwin van Gameren & Ingrid Ooms, 2009. "Childcare and labor force participation in the Netherlands: the importance of attitudes and opinions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 395-421, December.
  13. Cristina Borra & Luis Palma, 2009. "Child Care Choices in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 323-338, December.
  14. Cristina Borra, 2010. "Childcare cost and Spanish mother’s labour force participation," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 9-40, October.
  15. Eichhorst, Werner & Devisscher, Stephanie & Leoni, Thomas & Marx, Paul & Mühlberger, Ulrike & Schulte, Bernd & Vandeweghe, Barbara, 2010. "Report No. 24: Analysis of the Social Agendas," IZA Research Reports 24, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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