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The art of seeing like a state: State building in Afghanistan, the DR Congo, and beyond

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  • Christopher Coyne

    ()

  • Adam Pellillo

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11138-011-0150-8
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal The Review of Austrian Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 35-52

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Handle: RePEc:kap:revaec:v:25:y:2012:i:1:p:35-52

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100335

Related research

Keywords: High modernism; Métis ; State building; Weak states; Failed states; State capacity; Afghanistan; Democratic Republic of the Congo; B52; B53; O2;

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References

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  1. Daron Acemoglu & Davide Cantoni & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2011. "The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3286-3307, December.
  2. David B. Skarbek and Peter T. Leeson, 2009. "What Can Aid Do?," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 29(3), pages 391-397, Fall.
  3. Lyall, Jason & Wilson, Isaiah, 2009. "Rage Against the Machines: Explaining Outcomes in Counterinsurgency Wars," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(01), pages 67-106, January.
  4. del Castillo, Graciana, 2008. "Rebuilding War-Torn States: The Challenge of Post-Conflict Economic Reconstruction," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199237739.
  5. Claudia Williamson, 2010. "Exploring the failure of foreign aid: The role of incentives and information," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 17-33, March.
  6. Christopher J. Coyne & Adam Pellillo, 2011. "Economic reconstruction amidst conflict: Insights from Afghanistan and Iraq," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(6), pages 627-643, October.
  7. de Mesquita, Bruce Bueno & Downs, George W., 2006. "Intervention and Democracy," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(03), pages 627-649, July.
  8. Oeindrila Dube & Suresh Naidu, 2010. "Bases, Bullets, and Ballots: The Effect of U.S. Military Aid on Political Conflict in Colombia," Working Papers 197, Center for Global Development.
  9. Peter J. Boettke & Christopher J. Coyne & Peter T. Leeson, 2008. "Institutional Stickiness and the New Development Economics," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 331-358, 04.
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