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Smoking Restrictions as a Self-Control Mechanism

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  • Joni Hersch

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Abstract

Using data from Current Population Survey Tobacco Use Supplements spanning 1992–2002, this study shows that smokers who plan to quit smoking are more supportive of regulations than are other smokers. Failed quitters who plan to try again are more supportive of restrictions than are smokers planning to quit for the first time. These findings indicate that many smokers support regulatory restrictions to reduce their costs of quitting by exploiting the discipline offered by regulatory control. From 1992 to 2002, support for smoking restrictions in public areas rose dramatically among both nonsmokers and smokers. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11166-005-2927-2
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Risk and Uncertainty.

Volume (Year): 31 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 5-21

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:31:y:2005:i:1:p:5-21

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100299

Related research

Keywords: time inconsistency; addiction; smoking restrictions; smoking cessation; cigarettes;

References

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  7. Joni Hersch & Alison F. Del Rossi & W. Kip Viscusi, 2004. "Voter Preferences and State Regulation of Smoking," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(3), pages 455-468, July.
  8. Matthew C. Farrelly & William N. Evans & Edward Montgomery, 1999. "Do Workplace Smoking Bans Reduce Smoking?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 728-747, September.
  9. Shane Frederick & George Loewenstein & Ted O'Donoghue, 2002. "Time Discounting and Time Preference: A Critical Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 351-401, June.
  10. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Warner, Kenneth E., 2000. "The economics of smoking," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 29, pages 1539-1627 Elsevier.
  11. Suranovic, Steven M. & Goldfarb, Robert S. & Leonard, Thomas C., 1999. "An economic theory of cigarette addiction," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-29, January.
  12. Laux, Fritz L., 2000. "Addiction as a market failure: using rational addiction results to justify tobacco regulation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 421-437, July.
  13. Keeler, Theodore E. & Marciniak, Martin & Hu, Teh-wei, 1999. "Rational addiction and smoking cessation: An empirical study," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 633-643.
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  15. Schelling, Thomas C, 1984. "Self-Command in Practice, in Policy, and in a Theory of Rational Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 1-11, May.
  16. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
  17. repec:reg:rpubli:282 is not listed on IDEAS
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ayyagari Padmaja & Sindelar Jody L, 2010. "The Impact of Job Stress on Smoking and Quitting: Evidence from the HRS," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-32, March.
  2. Laibson, David I., 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," Scholarly Articles 4481499, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. John Beshears & James J. Choi & David Laibson & Brigitte Madrian, 2006. "Early Decisions: A Regulatory Framework," NBER Working Papers 11920, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Robert Scharff, 2009. "Obesity and Hyperbolic Discounting: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 3-21, March.
  5. Charles A.M. de Bartolome & Ian J. Irvine, 2010. "The Economics of Smoking Bans," Working Papers 201027, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  6. Lourdes Badillo Amador & Ángel López Nicolás, 2013. "Self-control and support for anti-smoking policies among smokers, ex smokers, and never smokers," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 161-170, April.
  7. Andrew Leicester & Peter Levell, 2013. "Anti-smoking policies and smoker well-being: evidence from Britain," IFS Working Papers W13/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Reto Odermatt & Alois Stutzer, 2013. "Smoking Bans, Cigarette Prices and Life Satisfaction," Working papers 2013/07, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.

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