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"Location, Location, Location!" The Price Gradient for Vacant Urban Land: New York, 1835 to 1900

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Author Info

  • Atack, Jeremy
  • Margo, Robert A

Abstract

We preview new archival evidence on the price of vacant land in New York City between 1835 and 1900. Before the Civil War, the price of land per square foot fell steeply with distance from New York's City Hall located in the central business district (CBD). After the Civil War, the distance gradient flattened and the fit of a simple regression of the log of land price per square foot on distance from the CBD declined markedly. Our most remarkable finding is that average nominal land prices at the CBD increased at an average annual rate of over 3 percent per year between 1835 and 1895, growing particularly rapidly around the time of the Civil War before declining as the century came to an end. Copyright 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Real Estate Finance & Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (1998)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 151-72

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jrefec:v:16:y:1998:i:2:p:151-72

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102945

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Cited by:
  1. Tse, Chung Yi & Chan, Alex W. H., 2003. "Estimating the commuting cost and commuting time property price gradients," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 745-767, October.
  2. Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt & Nicolai Wendland, 2011. "Fifty years of urban accessibility: the impact of the urban railway network on the land gradient in Berlin 1890-1936," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 29650, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. & Wendland, Nicolai, 2009. "Looming stations: Valuing transport innovations in historical context," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 97-99, October.
  4. Tom Nicholas & Anna Scherbina, 2013. "Real Estate Prices During the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 41(2), pages 278-309, 06.
  5. Satyajit Chatterjee & Burcu Eyigungor, 2012. "A tractable circular city model with an application to the effects of development constraints on land rents," Working Papers 12-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  6. Michael Iacono & David Levinson, 2011. "Accessibility Dynamics and Location Premia: Do Land Values Follow Accessibility Changes?," Working Papers 000087, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.

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