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The Corporation is Ailing Social Technology: Creating a ‘Fit for Purpose’ Design for Sustainability

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Author Info

  • L. Metcalf

    ()

  • S. Benn

    ()

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    Abstract

    Designed to facilitate economic development, the corporate form now threatens human survival. This article presents an argument that organisations are yet to be ‘fit for purpose’ and that the corporate form needs to be re-designed to reach sustainability. It suggests that organisations need to recognise their agent status amongst a much wider and highly complex array of interconnected, dynamic economic, environmental and social systems. Human Factors theory is drawn on to propose that business systems could be made sustainable through re-design. They could fit their environment more appropriately by improving: Efficiency, Adaptability and Social Cohesion. Leaders of organisations would also need to take a holistic approach to alter the organisation proactively to adapt to the systems within which it is embedded. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10551-012-1201-1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Business Ethics.

    Volume (Year): 111 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (December)
    Pages: 195-210

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:111:y:2012:i:2:p:195-210

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100281

    Related research

    Keywords: Complex adaptive systems; Complexity leadership; Corporate social responsibility; Human factors; Sustainability;

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    Cited by:
    1. Louise Metcalf & Sue Benn, 2013. "Leadership for Sustainability: An Evolution of Leadership Ability," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 112(3), pages 369-384, February.
    2. Janine Hiller, 2013. "The Benefit Corporation and Corporate Social Responsibility," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 118(2), pages 287-301, December.

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