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Teaching Bioeconomics

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  • Robert Yarbrough

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    Abstract

    Bioeconomics is a relatively young field that uses an expanded microeconomics to examine animal behavior, human behavior, and animal and human social institutions. A voluminous literature is rapidly accumulating. There are as yet no standard textbooks, but there are several excellent books and/or articles that can be used in combination with videos and other aids to make a course that students will enjoy and that teachers can use to advance the frontiers of scholarship in economics and biology. Copyright Springer 2005

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10818-005-0156-z
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Bioeconomics.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 (01)
    Pages: 1-38

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:7:y:2005:i:1:p:1-38

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=103315

    Related research

    Keywords: altruism; conflict; cooperation; evolution; game theory; institutions; rationality;

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    1. Maristella Botticini & Aloysius Siow, 2000. "Why Dowries?," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0200, Econometric Society.
    2. Baker, Matthew & Miceli, Thomas J., 2005. "Land inheritance rules: theory and cross-cultural analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 77-102, January.
    3. Matthew J. Baker, 2004. "Human Capital and Hold-ups in Indigenous Society: The Role of Customs and the Market," Departmental Working Papers 7, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:
    1. Robert Yarbrough, 2006. "Book Review," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 287-289, December.
    2. Janet Landa, 2012. "Gordon Tullock’s contributions to bioeconomics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 203-210, July.
    3. Kevin Kniffin, 2009. "Evolutionary perspectives on salary dispersion within firms," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 23-42, April.

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