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Accounting for economic evolution: Fitness and the population method

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  • John Metcalfe

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10818-008-9029-6
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Bioeconomics.

Volume (Year): 10 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 23-49

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:10:y:2008:i:1:p:23-49

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=103315

Related research

Keywords: Economic evolution; Economic fitness; Fisher-Price accounting; C00; L10; O10; O40;

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. John Stanley Metcalfe & Ronnie Ramlogan, 2006. "Creative Destruction and the Measurement of Productivity Change," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 97(5), pages 373-397.
  2. Geoffrey Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen, 2004. "The firm as an interactor: firms as vehicles for habits and routines," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 281-307, 07.
  3. Eric J. Bartelsman & Mark Doms, 2000. "Understanding productivity: lessons from longitudinal microdata," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Kurt Dopfer & John Foster & Jason Potts, 2004. "Micro-meso-macro," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 263-279, 07.
  5. Thorbj�rn Knudsen, 2004. "General selection theory and economic evolution: The Price equation and the replicator/interactor distinction," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 147-173.
  6. Metcalfe, J S, 2001. "Institutions and Progress," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 561-86, September.
  7. Michael D. Cohen & Roger Burkhart & Giovanni Dosi & Massimo Egidi & Luigi Marengo & Massimo Warglien & Sidney Winter & with comments by Benjamin Coriat, 1995. "Routines and Other Recurring Action Patterns of Organizations: Contemporary Research Issues," Working Papers 95-11-101, Santa Fe Institute.
  8. Richard R. Nelson & Sidney G. Winter, 2002. "Evolutionary Theorizing in Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 23-46, Spring.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. A. Rainer & R. Strohmaier, 2014. "Modeling the diffusion of general purpose technologies in an evolutionary multi-sector framework," Empirica, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 425-444, August.
  2. Kaldasch, Joachim, 2014. "Evolutionary Model of Moore’s Law," MPRA Paper 54397, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Ulrich Witt, 2013. "The Future of Evolutionary Economics: Why Modalities Matter," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-09, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  4. Giulio Bottazzi & Pietro Dindo, 2013. "Evolution and market behavior in economics and finance: introduction to the special issue," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 507-512, July.
  5. Richard Sosis & Paul Swartwout, 2008. "Demonstrating group selection: A comment on Janet Landa’s ‘The bioeconomics of homogenous middleman groups as adaptive units’," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 297-301, December.
  6. Stan Metcalfe, 2012. "J.A. Schumpeter and the Theory of Economic Evolution (One Hundred Years beyond the Theory of Economic Development)," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2012-13, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  7. Benjamin David, 2014. "Contribution of ICT on Labor Market Polarization: an Evolutionary Approach," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-25, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
  8. Janet Landa, 2008. "The bioeconomics of homogeneous middleman groups as adaptive units: Theory and empirical evidence viewed from a group selection framework," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 259-278, December.

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