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Measuring the Effect of Federal Research Funding on Private Donations at Research Universities: Is Federal Research Funding More than a Substitute for Private Donations?

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  • A. Payne

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Abstract

The nature of federal research funding has changed in the United States over the last 30 years. In part, federal research funding has changed in the distribution of funding across disciplines and across universities. Federal funding to universities with historically low levels of funding has also experienced greater growth than those universities with historically high levels of funding. In addition, universities have become more involved in the political process with respect to the allocation of funding for higher education. As the nature of government funding changes, this paper questions its effect on private donations to research and non-research universities. The general presumption of much of the existing theoretical work is that government and private funding for charitable goods are substitutes. Limited evidence exists to suggest, in some circumstances, there may be a positive correlation between these two sources of funding. Potentially, because the government undertakes the expense to gather information about the research universities, and engages in such activities as peer-review of research proposals, the government through its grant awards may provide a signal of quality of research or other information to donors that is less noisy than that available to private donors. Similarly, there may be other types of spillover effects from research funding to private donations. In this case, a change in government grants has both a positive and negative effect on private donations, suggesting a positive correlation between private and public donations if the effect from the dissemination of information is greater than the substitution effect of government grants. I examine data for private and public universities in the United States to measure the relationship between private and public donations under a fixed-effects OLS regression. I explore issues of bias from endogeneity or omitted variables and report the results from a two stage least squares regression in which I use a set of measures that affect federal research funding but not private donations. Regardless of the specification, the results suggest private and public donations are positively correlated for research universities and negatively correlated for non-research institutions. On average, increasing federal research funding by one dollar increases private donations by 65 cents at research universities, decreases private donations by 9 cents at universities whose highest degree granted is a masters, and decreases private donations by 45 cents at liberal arts colleges. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal International Tax and Public Finance.

Volume (Year): 8 (2001)
Issue (Month): 5 (November)
Pages: 731-751

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Handle: RePEc:kap:itaxpf:v:8:y:2001:i:5:p:731-751

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102915

Related research

Keywords: higher education; federal research funding; private donations; crowd-out;

References

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  1. Steinberg, Richard S, 1987. "Voluntary Donations and Public Expenditures in a Federal System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(1), pages 24-36, March.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Andreoni, James & Payne, A. Abigail, 2011. "Is crowding out due entirely to fundraising? Evidence from a panel of charities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(5-6), pages 334-343, June.
  2. Eckel, Catherine C. & Grossman, Philip J. & Johnston, Rachel M., 2005. "An experimental test of the crowding out hypothesis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(8), pages 1543-1560, August.
  3. Rausser, Gordon C. & Papineau, Maya, 2008. "Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt41j9f6ks, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  4. Lee, Chul-In, 2007. "Does provision of public rental housing crowd out private housing investment? A panel VAR approach," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-20, March.
  5. Bae, Kee-Hong & Kim, Seung-Bo & Kim, Woochan, 2012. "Family control and expropriation at not-for-profit organizations: evidence from korean private universities," MPRA Paper 44029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. James Andreoni & A. Abigail Payne & Sarah Smith, 2013. "Do Grants to Charities Crowd Out Other Income? Evidence from the UK," NBER Working Papers 18998, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. James Andreoni & Abigail Payne, 2007. "Crowding out Both Sides of the Philanthropy Market: Evidence from a Panel of Charities," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000001769, UCLA Department of Economics.
  8. Andreoni,J., 2002. "Leadership giving in charitable fund-raising," Working papers 13, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  9. Maryann Feldman & Lauren Lanahan, 2013. "State Science Policy Experiments," NBER Chapters, in: The Changing Frontier: Rethinking Science and Innovation Policy National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Crumpler, Heidi & Grossman, Philip J., 2008. "An experimental test of warm glow giving," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1011-1021, June.
  11. Jim Andreoni & Abigail Payne & Sarah Smith, . "Do The Maths: Do grants to charities crowd out other income? Evidence from the UK Abstract: We present new evidence on the effect of grants on charities’ incomes. We employ a novel identification st," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/301, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  12. Yildirim, Huseyin, 2014. "Andreoni–McGuire algorithm and the limits of warm-glow giving," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 101-107.

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