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Global Warming and German Agriculture Impact Estimations Using a Restricted Profit Function

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  • Günter Lang

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Abstract

This study uses the concept of shadow prices formeasuring the impacts of climate change. By estimatinga restricted profit function rather than a cost or aproduction function the explanatory power of the modelis increased because of an endogenous outputstructure. Using low aggregated panel data on WesternGerman farmers, the results imply that the agricultural production process is significantly influenced by climate conditions. Simulation results using a 2 ×CO 2 climate scenario show positive impactsfor all regions in Germany. Interestingly, the spatialdistribution of the gains is indicating no advantagefor those regions, which currently suffer frominsufficient temperature. Finally, the importance ofan endogenous output structure is confirmed by thefinding that the desired product mix will drasticallychange. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in its journal Environmental and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 97-112

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Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:19:y:2001:i:2:p:97-112

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100263

Related research

Keywords: agriculture; climate change; environmental valuation; global warming; impact study; restricted profit function;

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  1. W. Erwin Diewert & T.J. Wales, 1989. "Flexible Functional Forms and Global Curvature Conditions," NBER Technical Working Papers 0040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mendelsohn, Robert & Nordhaus, William D & Shaw, Daigee, 1994. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A Ricardian Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 753-71, September.
  3. Reilly, John & Hohmann, Neil, 1993. "Climate Change and Agriculture: The Role of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 306-12, May.
  4. repec:fth:calaec:10-99 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. William R. Cline, 1992. "Economics of Global Warming, The," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 39.
  6. Livernois, John R & Ryan, David L, 1989. "Testing for Non-jointness in Oil and Gas Exploration: A Variable Profit Function Approach," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 479-504, May.
  7. Beach, Robert H. & Thomson, Allison M. & McCarl, Bruce A., 2010. "Climate Change Impacts On Us Agriculture," Proceedings Issues, 2010: Climate Change in World Agriculture: Mitigation, Adaptation, Trade and Food Security, June 2010, Stuttgart- Hohenheim, Germany 91393, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  8. Kolstad, Charles D. & Kelly, David L. & Mitchell, Glenn, 1999. "Adjustment Costs from Environmental Change Induced by Incomplete Information and Learning," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt9mx119gc, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
  9. Dixon, Bruce L. & Hollinger, Steven E. & Garcia, Philip & Tirupattur, Viswanath, 1994. "Estimating Corn Yield Response Models To Predict Impacts Of Climate Change," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
  10. Kelly, David L. & Kolstad, Charles D. & Mitchell, Glenn T., 2005. "Adjustment costs from environmental change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 468-495, November.
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