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Evaluating The Impacts Of Microsaving: The Case Of Sewa Bank In India

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  • Gunhild Berg

    ()
    (KfW Development Bank)

Abstract

This paper estimates the impact of participating in the savings program of SEWA Bank in India on household income and consumption. Contrary to microcredit, microsaving has not received much attention in the empirical literature yet which can be explained by a lack of reliable household data. The paper uses panel data to account for individual unobserved effects that can lead to substantial biases when not being controlled for. I find that when controlling for self-selection, no significant impacts of the program can be observed and that naive estimates, which do not account for selection biases, severely overstate program impacts.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics in its journal Journal Of Economic Development.

Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 75-96

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Handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:35:y:2010:i:1:p:75-96

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Related research

Keywords: Microfinance; Microsaving; Impact Evaluation; Panel Data; India;

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  1. Coleman, Brett E., 1999. "The impact of group lending in Northeast Thailand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 105-141, October.
  2. Alan B. Krueger & Mikael Lindahl, 2000. "Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?," NBER Working Papers 7591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Rosenzweig, Mark R., 1986. "Risk, Implicit Contracts and the Family in Rural Areas of Low-Income Countries," Bulletins 7518, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
  4. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 1999. "Are the poor less well insured? Evidence on vulnerability to income risk in rural China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 61-81, February.
  5. Udry, Christopher, 1994. "Risk and Insurance in a Rural Credit Market: An Empirical Investigation in Northern Nigeria," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 495-526, July.
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  7. Thomas, D., 1989. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Papers 586, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  8. Imran Matin & David Hulme & Stuart Rutherford, 2002. "Finance for the poor: from microcredit to microfinancial services," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(2), pages 273-294.
  9. Gwendolyn Alexander Tedeschi, 2008. "Overcoming Selection Bias in Microcredit Impact Assessments: A Case Study in Peru," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 504-518.
  10. Vani K. Borooah, 2005. "Caste, Inequality, and Poverty in India," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 399-414, 08.
  11. Robert M. Townsend, 1995. "Consumption Insurance: An Evaluation of Risk-Bearing Systems in Low-Income Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 83-102, Summer.
  12. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
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