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Effects of main actor, outcome and affect on biased braking speed judgments

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  • Ola Svenson
  • Gabriella Eriksson
  • Paul Slovic
  • C. K. Mertz
  • Tina Fuglestad
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    Abstract

    Subjects who judged speed in a driving scenario overestimated how fast they could decelerate when speeding compared to when keeping within the speed limit (Svenson, 2009). The purpose of the present studies were to replicate studies conducted in Europe with subjects in the U.S., to study the influence of speed unit (kph vs. mph), affective reactions to outcome (collision) and identity of main actor (driver) on braking speed judgments. The results replicated the European findings and the outcome affective factor (passing a line/killing a child) and the actor factor (subject/driver in general) had significant effects on judgments of braking speed. The results were related to psychological theory and applied implications were discussed.

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    File URL: http://journal.sjdm.org/12/12224/jdm12224.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 235-243

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    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:7:y:2012:i:3:p:235-253

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    Related research

    Keywords: overconfidence; driving speed; braking; affect heuristic; traffic safety.;

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    1. Klaus Wertenbroch & Dilip Soman & Amitava Chattopadhyay, 2007. "On the Perceived Value of Money: The Reference Dependence of Currency Numerosity Effects," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 1-10, 03.
    2. John C. Hershey & Howard C. Kunreuther & Paul J. H. Schoemaker, 1982. "Sources of Bias in Assessment Procedures for Utility Functions," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 28(8), pages 936-954, August.
    3. Eyal Peer, 2010. "Exploring the time-saving bias: How drivers misestimate time saved when increasing speed," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(7), pages 477-488, December.
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