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The limited value of precise tests of the recognition heuristic

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  • Thorsten Pachur
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    Abstract

    The recognition heuristic models the adaptive use and dominant role of recognition knowledge in judgment under uncertainty. Of the several predictions that the heuristic makes, empirical tests have predominantly focused on the proposed noncompensatory processing of recognition. Some authors have emphasized that the heuristic needs to be scrutinized based on precise tests of the exclusive use of recognition. Although precise tests have clear merits, I critically evaluate the value of such tests as they are currently employed. First, I argue that using precise measures of the exclusive use of recognition has to go beyond showing that the recognition heuristic---like every model---cannot capture reality completely. Second, I illustrate how precise tests based on response times can lead to unsubstantiated conclusions if the fact that the recognition heuristic does not model the recognition judgment itself is ignored. Finally, I highlight two key but so far neglected aspects of the recognition heuristic: (a) the connection between recognition memory and the recognition heuristic; and (b) the mechanisms underlying the adaptive use of recognition.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 (July)
    Pages: 413-422

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    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:6:y:2011:i:5:p:413-422

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    Related research

    Keywords: recognition heuristic; memory; noncompensatory; response times; ecological rationality.;

    References

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    1. Andreas Glockner & Arndt Broder, 2011. "Processing of recognition information and additional cues: A model-based analysis of choice, confidence, and response time," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 23-42, February.
    2. Gerd Gigerenzer & Daniel G. Goldstein, 2011. "The recognition heuristic: A decade of research," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 100-121, February.
    3. Benjamin E. Hilbig, 2010. "Precise models deserve precise measures: A methodological dissection," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 272-284, July.
    4. Tversky, Amos & Kahneman, Daniel, 1992. " Advances in Prospect Theory: Cumulative Representation of Uncertainty," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 297-323, October.
    5. Edgar Erdfelder & Carolina E. Kupper-Tetzel & Sandra D. Mattern, 2011. "Threshold models of recognition and the recognition heuristic," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 7-22, February.
    6. Onvara Oeusoonthornwattana & David R. Shanks, 2010. "I like what I know: Is recognition a non-compensatory determiner of consumer choice?," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 310-325, July.
    7. Tracy Tomlinson & Julian N. Marewski & Michael Dougherty, 2011. "Four challenges for cognitive research on the recognition heuristic and a call for a research strategy shift," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(1), pages 89-99, February.
    8. Clintin P. Davis-Stober & Jason Dana & David V. Budescu, 2010. "Why recognition is rational: Optimality results on single-variable decision rules," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(4), pages 216-229, July.
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    Cited by:
    1. Julian N. Marewski & Rudiger F. Pohl & Oliver Vitouch, 2011. "Recognition-based judgments and decisions: What we have learned (so far)," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(5), pages 359-380, July.
    2. Benjamin E. Hilbig, 2014. "On the role of recognition in consumer choice: A model comparison," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 9(1), pages 51-57, January.
    3. Julian N. Marewski & Katja Mehlhorn, 2011. "Using the ACT-R architecture to specify 39 quantitative process models of decision making," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(6), pages 439-519, August.
    4. Andreas Glockner & Benjamin E. Hilbig, 2011. "Editorial: Methodology in judgment and decision making research," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 705-710, December.

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