Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Maximizers versus satisficers: Decision-making styles, competence, and outcomes

Contents:

Author Info

  • Andrew M. Parker
  • W�ndi Bruine de Bruin
  • Baruch Fischhoff
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007). Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al.\ (2002), we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions, more avoidance of decision making, and greater tendency to experience regret. Contrary to predictions, self-reported maximizers were more likely to report spontaneous decision making. However, the relationship between self-reported maximizing and worse life outcomes is largely unaffected by controls for measures of other decision-making styles, decision-making competence, and demographic variables.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://journal.sjdm.org/jdm7830.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://journal.sjdm.org/7830/jdm7830.htm
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Society for Judgment and Decision Making in its journal Judgment and Decision Making.

    Volume (Year): 2 (2007)
    Issue (Month): (December)
    Pages: 342-350

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:2:y:2007:i::p:342-350

    Contact details of provider:

    Related research

    Keywords: maximizing; satisficing; decision making; competence; decision style.;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Simon, Herbert A, 1978. "Rationality as Process and as Product of Thought," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 1-16, May.
    2. Dhar, Ravi, 1997. " Consumer Preference for a No-Choice Option," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 215-31, September.
    3. Crossley, Craig D. & Highhouse, Scott, 2005. "Relation of job search and choice process with subsequent satisfaction," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 255-268, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. C. Wickramasinghe & Nobaya Ahmad & Sharifah Rashid & Zahid Emby, 2011. "Impact of Subjective Well-Being on Success of Technological Knowledge Creation among Independent Inventors in Developing Countries: A First Look at Sri Lanka," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 432-452, September.
    2. Andrew M. Parker & Leandro S. Carvalho & Susann Rohwedder, 2013. "Cognitive Ability, Expectations, and Beliefs about the Future: Psychological Influences on Retirement Decisions," Working Papers wp298, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    3. Beja, Edsel Jr., 2012. "Drawing out the Satisficer from the Maximizer," MPRA Paper 39355, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:jdm:journl:v:2:y:2007:i::p:342-350. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jonathan Baron).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.