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Skill in Games

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Author Info

  • Patrick Larkey

    (H. J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)

  • Joseph B. Kadane

    (Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)

  • Robert Austin

    (Harvard Business School, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139)

  • Shmuel Zamir

    (Department of Statistics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel)

Abstract

Differences in players' skill are important determinants of relative player success in most real games such as poker, chess, basketball, business, and politics. Yet conventional game theory has concentrated primarily on games with no skill differences among players. This paper uses a simplified version of stud poker to better understand the concept of differential player skill in games. Players with very different strategies for playing this game are modeled algorithmically and pitted against one another in simulation tournaments.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.43.5.596
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by INFORMS in its journal Management Science.

Volume (Year): 43 (1997)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 596-609

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Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:43:y:1997:i:5:p:596-609

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Related research

Keywords: Bayesian game theory; game theory; poker; simulation; strategy;

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Cited by:
  1. Otwin Becker & Tanja Feit & Vera Hofer & Ulrike Leopold-Wildburger & Reinhard Selten, 2007. "Educational effects in an experiment with the management game SINTO-Market," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 301-308, November.
  2. Marcel Dreef & Peter Borm & Ben van der Genugten, 2004. "A new relative skill measure for games with chance elements," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(5), pages 255-264.
  3. Borm, P.E.M. & Genugten, B.B. van der, 2001. "On a relative measure of skill for games with chance elements," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-88286, Tilburg University.
  4. Dreef, M.R.M. & Borm, P.E.M. & Genugten, B.B. van der, 2002. "On Strategy and Relative Skill in Poker," Discussion Paper 2002-59, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  5. Vito Fragnelli & Maria Erminia Marina, 2011. "Skill and Chance in Insurance Policies," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 191-202, August.
  6. Joseph Kadane & Javier Girón & Daniel Peña & Peter Fishburn & Simon French & D. Lindley & Giovanni Parmigiani & Robert Winkler, 1993. "Several Bayesians: A review," TEST: An Official Journal of the Spanish Society of Statistics and Operations Research, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-32, December.

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