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The Job Satisfaction-Productivity Nexus: A Study Using Matched Survey and Register Data

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  • Petri B?ckerman
  • Pekka Ilmakunnas

Abstract

The authors examine the role of employee job satisfaction in Finnish manufacturing plants over the period 1996?2001 to determine the extent to which it affects establishment-level productivity. Using matched data on job satisfaction from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) and information on establishment productivity from longitudinal register data linked to the ECHP, they estimate that the effect of an increase in the establishment's average level of employee job satisfaction on productivity is positive, but its magnitude varies depending on the specification of the model. The authors use an instrumental variables point estimate and find that an increase in the measure of job satisfaction by one within-plant standard deviation increases value-added per hours worked in manufacturing by 6.6%.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 65 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 244-262

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:65:y:2012:i:2:p:244-262

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References

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  1. Malcolm Patterson & Peter Warr & Michael West, 2004. "Organizational climate and company productivity: the role of employee affect and employee level," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19977, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Lisa M Lynch & Sandra E Black, 2002. "How to Compete: The Impact of Workplace Practices and Information Technology on Productivity," Working Papers 02-04, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. Andrew Clark & Yannis Georgellis & Peter Sanfey, . "Job Satisfaction, Wage changes and Quits: Evidence from Germany," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 98-06, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  4. G. Steven Olley & Ariel Pakes, 1992. "The Dynamics of Productivity in the Telecommunications Equipment Industry," NBER Working Papers 3977, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1994. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," NBER Technical Working Papers 0151, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. M Patterson & P Warr & M West, 2004. "Organizational Climate and Company Productivity: the Role of Employee Affect and Employee Level," CEP Discussion Papers dp0626, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Eero Lehto, 2007. "Regional Impact of Research and Development on Productivity," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 623-638.
  8. Franco Peracchi, 2002. "The European Community Household Panel: A review," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 63-90.
  9. Sinikka Vanhala & Kaija Tuomi, 2006. "HRM, Company Performance and Employee Well-being," management revue. Socio-economic Studies, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 17(3), pages 241-255.
  10. Oswald, Andrew & Proto, Eugenio & Sgroi, Daniel, 2013. "Happiness and Productivity," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 108, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  11. John Zelenski & Steven Murphy & David Jenkins, 2008. "The Happy-Productive Worker Thesis Revisited," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 521-537, December.
  12. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2004. "Subjective Outcomes in Economics," NBER Working Papers 10361, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Buhai, Sebastian & Cottini, Elena & Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels, 2008. "The impact of workplace conditions on firm performance," Working Papers 08-13, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  14. Jacques Mairesse & Nathalie Greenan, 1999. "Using Employee Level Data in a Firm Level Econometric Study," NBER Working Papers 7028, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 135-41, May.
  16. repec:dgr:uvatin:2008077 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
  2. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve & Ed Diener & Louis Tay & Cody Xuereb, 2013. "The objective benefits of subjective well-being," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51669, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve & Ed Diener & Louis Tay & Cody Xuereb, 2013. "The Objective Benefits of Subjective Well-Being," CEP Discussion Papers dp1236, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Tumen, Semih & Zeydanli, Tugba, 2014. "Is Happiness Contagious? Separating Spillover Externalities from the Group-Level Social Context," MPRA Paper 53184, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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