Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Will I See You at Work? Ethnic Workplace Segregation in Sweden, 1985-2002

Contents:

Author Info

  • Olof Aslund
  • Oskar Nordström Skans

Abstract

Using linked employer-employee data covering the entire working-age Swedish population between 1985 and 2002, the authors present evidence of substantial and increasing ethnic workplace segregation. Immigrants have been especially subject to segregation, being overexposed both to workers from their own birth region and to immigrants from other regions. Segregation is generally negatively correlated with economic status: groups with low employment rates are more segregated from natives; groups with many immigrant colleagues earn less than those more native colleagues; and the higher the number of immigrants to which individuals are exposed, the lower their wages. When local labor market conditions improve, however, segregation decreases. Though the degree and nature of segregation varies substantially across ethnic groups, the patterns are quite persistent over time.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 63 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 471-493

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:63:y:2010:i:3:p:471-493

Contact details of provider:
Fax: 607-255-8016
Web page: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Postal: 381 Ives East, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3901
Email:
Web: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kimberly Bayard & Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark & Kenneth R. Troske, 1999. "Why Are Racial And Ethnic Wage Gaps Larger For Men Than For Women? Exploring The Role Of Segregation Using The New Worker-Establishment Characteristics Database," Labor and Demography, EconWPA 9902002, EconWPA.
  2. Kevin Lang & William T. Dickens, 1987. "Neoclassical and Sociological Perspectives on Segmented Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 2127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Gilles Saint Paul, 1999. "On the distribution of income and worker assignment under intra-firm spillovers, with an application to ideas and networks," Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra 417, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  4. Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2006. "Workplace Segregation in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Skill," Working Papers, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics 060710, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  5. Patrick Bayer & Hanming Fang & Robert McMillan, 2011. "Separate When Equal? Racial Inequality and Residential Segregation," Working Papers, Duke University, Department of Economics 11-09, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  6. Carrington, William J & Troske, Kenneth R, 1997. "On Measuring Segregation in Samples with Small Units," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(4), pages 402-09, October.
  7. Edin, Per-Anders & Fredriksson, Peter, 2000. "LINDA - Longitudinal INdividual DAta for Sweden," Working Paper Series, Uppsala University, Department of Economics 2000:19, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  8. Alireza Behtoui, 2004. "Unequal Opportunities for Young People with Immigrant Backgrounds in the Swedish Labour Market," LABOUR, CEIS, CEIS, vol. 18(4), pages 633-660, December.
  9. Nekby, Lena, 2002. "How Long Does it Take to Integrate? Employment Convergence of Immigrants and Natives in Sweden," Working Paper Series, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research 185, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Kramarz, Francis & Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2011. "When strong ties are strong Networks and youth labor market entry," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies, Uppsala University, Department of Economics 2011:18, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  2. Olof Åslund & Anders Böhlmark & Oskar Nordström Skans, 2012. "Childhood and Family Experiences and the Social Integration of Young Migrants," Norface Discussion Paper Series, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London 2012003, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Erling Barth & Bernt Bratsberg & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2011. "Immigrant Wage Profiles Within and Between Establishments," Norface Discussion Paper Series, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London 2011019, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Olof Aslund & Lena Hensvik & Oskar Nordstrom Skans, 2009. "Seeking similarity: How immigrants and natives manage at the labor market," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0932, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  5. Glitz, Albrecht, 2012. "Ethnic Segregation in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6841, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Meta Brown & Elizabeth Setren & Giorgio Topa, 2012. "Do informal referrals lead to better matches? Evidence from a firm's employee referral system," Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 568, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  7. Eliasson, Tove, 2013. "Decomposing immigrant wage assimilation - the role of workplaces and occupations," Working Paper Series, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy 2013:7, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  8. Olof Aslund & Anders Bohlmark & Oskar Nordstrom Skans, 2009. "Age at migration and social integration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0927, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  9. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Uta Schoenberg, 2011. "Referral-based Job Search Networks," Norface Discussion Paper Series, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London 2011012, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:63:y:2010:i:3:p:471-493. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ILR Review).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.