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Profit sharing, employment stability, and wage growth

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Author Info

  • Omar Azfar
  • Stephan Danninger

Abstract

The authors conjecture that profit-sharing reduces turnover and thus increases expected returns to firm-specific human capital investments, so that the optimal levels of skill acquisition and investment in firm-specific skills rise and ultimately increase productivity. Empirical evidence from NLSY data on white men in nonunion jobs between 1988 and 1994 supports this hypothesis. Employees participating in profit-sharing plans were less likely than non-participants to separate from their jobs. They also received training more frequently and for longer durations. Finally, the authors show that profit-sharing was related to higher wage growth, indicating a faster rate of skill accumulation. (Author's abstract.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 54 (2001)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 619-630

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:54:y:2001:i:3:p:619-630

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Cited by:
  1. Park, Rhokeun, 2012. "Cognitive and affective approaches to employee participation: Integration of the two approaches," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 450-458.
  2. Green, Colin P. & Heywood, John S., 2010. "Profit sharing and the quality of relations with the boss," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 859-867, October.
  3. Göddeke, Anna & Haucap, Justus & Herr, Annika & Wey, Christian, 2011. "Stabilität und Wandel von Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen aus wettbewerbsökonomischer Sicht," DICE Ordnungspolitische Perspektiven 10, Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
  4. Morissette, Rene Rosa, Julio, 2003. "Alternative Work Practices and Quit Rates: Methodological Issues and Empirical Evidence for Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003199e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  5. Thomas Cornelissen & John S. Heywood & Uwe Jirjahn, 2010. "Profit Sharing and Reciprocity: Theory and Survey Evidence," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 292, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  6. Kauhanen, Antti & Piekkola, Hannu, 2002. "Rent Sharing as Part of Incentive Payments and Recruitment," Discussion Papers 793, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  7. Palsule-Desai, Omkar D. & Tirupati, Devanath & Chandra, Pankaj, 2013. "Stability issues in supply chain networks: Implications for coordination mechanisms," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 179-193.
  8. Pablo González, 2002. "Profit Sharing Reconsidered: Efficiency Wages and Renegotiation Costs," Documentos de Trabajo 151, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  9. Kraft, Kornelius & Lang, Julia, 2011. "Profit Sharing and Training," IZA Discussion Papers 6118, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Douglas L. Kruse & Joseph R. Blasi & Richard B. Freeman, 2012. "Does Linking Worker Pay to Firm Performance Help the Best Firms Do Even Better?," NBER Working Papers 17745, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Douglas Kruse & Richard Freeman & Joseph Blasi, 2008. "Do Workers Gain by Sharing? Employee Outcomes under Employee Ownership, Profit Sharing, and Broad-based Stock Options," NBER Working Papers 14233, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Leila Baghdadi & Rihab Bellakhal & Marc-Arthur Diaye, 2012. "Do French firms use financial participation to transfer more risk to their workers?," Documents de recherche 12-10, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
  13. Parent, Daniel, 2004. "Incentives? The effect of profit sharing plans offered by previous employers on current wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 37-42, April.
  14. Harbaugh, Rick, 2005. "The effect of employee stock ownership on wage and employment bargaining," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 565-583, September.
  15. Kauhanen, Antti & Piekkola, Hannu, 2002. "Profit Sharing in Finland: Earnings and Productivity Effects," Discussion Papers 817, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  16. Piekkola, Hannu, 2002. "Transferability of Human Capital and Job Switches," Discussion Papers 794, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  17. C Green & J S Heywood, 2007. "Does profit sharing increase training by reducing turnover?," Working Papers 589032, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  18. Long, Richard J. & Fang, Tony, 2012. "Do Employees Profit from Profit Sharing? Evidence from Canadian Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 6749, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  19. Long, Richard J. & Fang, Tony, 2013. "Profit Sharing and Workplace Productivity: Does Teamwork Play a Role?," IZA Discussion Papers 7869, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  20. Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe, 2009. "Profit sharing and firm size: The role of team production," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 246-258, August.

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