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Disability retirement among German men in the 1980s

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Author Info

  • R. T. Riphahn

Abstract

In Germany, a large proportion of new retirees-at times, more than half of them-have taken disability retirement. This study investigates the role of expected benefits in determining that choice. The author finds that among German men in 1984-91, age, health, and prior wages were much stronger predictors of the transition into disability retirement than were expected benefits. She concludes that a benefit reduction would be largely ineffective in reducing the high level of disability retirement in Germany. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 52 (1999)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 628-647

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:52:y:1999:i:4:p:628-647

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Cited by:
  1. Axel Börsch-Supan & Simone Kohnz & Reinhold Schnabel, 2007. "The Budget Impact of Reduced Early Retirement Incentives on the German Public Pension System," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Fiscal Implications of Reform, pages 201-252 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Haan, Peter & Myck, Michal, 2009. "Dynamics of health and labor market risks," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1116-1125, December.
  3. Hanel, Barbara, 2012. "The effect of disability pension incentives on early retirement decisions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 595-607.
  4. Haan, Peter & Myck, Michal, 2009. "Dynamics of Poor Health and Non-Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 4154, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Barbara Hanel, 2010. "Disability Pensions and Labor Supply," Working Papers 086, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
  6. Börsch-Supan, Axel H. & Wilke, Christina B., 2004. "Reforming the German Public Pension System," Discussion Paper 226, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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