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What is a promotion?

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  • Michael R. Pergamit
  • Jonathan R. Veum
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    Abstract

    Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data, the authors analyze the determinants and consequences of a promotion among young workers. Most events that workers called "promotions" involved no change in position or duties, but were simply an upgrade of the current position. Typically, only one person was considered for the promotion. Men were more likely to be promoted than women, and whites more likely than blacks or Hispanics. The acquisition of company training and the receipt of a prior promotion were two of the most important predictors of promotion. Consequences of promotion included increased wages, training receipt, supervisory responsibilities, and increased job satisfaction. There is little evidence that promotion had a direct impact on job attachment. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 52 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 581-601

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    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:52:y:1999:i:4:p:581-601

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    Cited by:
    1. Bognanno, Michael L. & Melero Martín, Eduardo, 2012. "Promotion Signals, Age and Education," IZA Discussion Papers 6431, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Adams, Scott J., 2004. "Age discrimination legislation and the employment of older workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 219-241, April.
    3. Michael R. Pergamit, 2001. "The National Longitudinal Surveys," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 239-253, Spring.
    4. Claudia Burgard & Katja Görlitz, 2011. "Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender: An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 394, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Asiedu, Kofi Fred & Folmer, Henk, 2007. "Does Privatization Improve Job Satisfaction? The Case of Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1779-1795, October.
    6. Ferreira, Priscila, 2009. "The determinants of promotions and firm separations," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Lima, Francisco & Pereira, Pedro T., 2001. "Careers and Wage Growth within Large Firms," IZA Discussion Papers 336, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Anne-Marie Daune-Richard & Pierre Béret & Arnaud Dupray & Christine Fournier & Stéphanie Moullet, 2002. "Les disparités de carrières des hommes et des femmes : accès à l'emploi, mobilités et salaires," Working Papers halshs-00005795, HAL.
    9. Oxoby, Robert J., 2002. "Status characteristics, cognitive bias, and incentives in teams," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 301-316.
    10. Machado, C. Sofia & Portela, Miguel, 2013. "Age and Opportunities for Promotion," IZA Discussion Papers 7784, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Russo, Giovanni & Hassink, Wolter, 2011. "Multiple Glass Ceilings," IZA Discussion Papers 5828, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Oxoby, Robert J., 2008. "Skill uncertainty and social inference," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 400-405, June.
    13. Robert Oxoby, 2009. "Social Inference and Occupational Choice: Type-Based Biases in a Bayesian Model of Class Formation," Working Papers 2009-07, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 11 Jan 2009.
    14. Deborah Cobb-Clark, 2001. "Getting Ahead: The Determinants of Payoffs to Internal Promotion for Young U.S. Men and Women," CEPR Discussion Papers 430, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    15. Mañé Vernet, Ferran & Benner, Chris, 2009. "Dead-End Jobs or Career Opportunities? Advancement opportunities in call centers," Working Papers 2072/42870, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    16. repec:dgr:uvatin:2006084 is not listed on IDEAS

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