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Changing consequences of job separation in the United States

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  • Daniel Polsky
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    Abstract

    Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the author examines the consequences of job loss between the periods 1976-81 and 1986-91. He finds stability in the overall incidence of job separation, but a statistically significant increase in the incidence of involuntary job loss, relative to quits, for older workers. He also finds that the consequences of involuntary job loss worsened: the reemployment rate of workers who experienced involuntary job loss dropped from 67% in 1976-81 to 62% in 1986-91, and among those who found new jobs, the odds of receiving a large wage cut rose from 9% in 1976-81 to 17% in 1986-91. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 52 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 565-580

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    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:52:y:1999:i:4:p:565-580

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    Cited by:
    1. Hospido, Laura, 2010. "Job Changes and Individual-Job Specific Wage Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 5088, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Francis Green, 2003. "The Rise and Decline of Job Insecurity," Studies in Economics 0305, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
    3. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven Sass & Mauricio Soto & Natalia Zhivan, 2006. "Has the Displacement of Older Workers Increased?," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2006-17, Center for Retirement Research, revised Sep 2006.
    4. Nancy Bertaux & Hervé Queneau, 2002. "The social economics of job security," Forum for Social Economics, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 1-19, September.
    5. Miikka Rokkanen & Roope Uusitalo, 2013. "Changes in Job Stability – Evidence from Lifetime Job Histories," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 36-55, Autumn.
    6. Bruce Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2004. "Employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market: the complete picture of gross worker flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-34, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. David Neumark, 2001. "Age Discrimination Legislation in the United States," NBER Working Papers 8152, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Daniel Rodriguez & Madeline Zavodny, 2001. "Family structure and sex differences in postdisplacement outcomes," Working Paper 2001-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    9. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley, 2000. "The Long Run Costs of Job Loss as Measured by Consumption Changes," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0320, Econometric Society.
    10. José María Arranz, . "La Seguridad Del Empleo En España: Evidencia Con Datos De La Epa (1987-2003)," Working Papers 5-04 Classification-JEL :, Instituto de Estudios Fiscales.
    11. David Neumark, 2000. "Changes in Job Stability and Job Security: A Collective Effort to Untangle, Reconcile, and Interpret the Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7472, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Tsou, Meng-Wen & Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K. & Chang, Ching-Fu, 2013. "The impact of foreign direct investment in China on employment adjustments in Taiwan: Evidence from matched employer–employee data," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25, pages 68-79.
    13. Eichhorst, Werner & Boeri, Tito & Braga, Michela & De Coen, An & Galasso, Vincenzo & Gerard, Maarten & Kendzia, Michael J. & Mayrhuber, Christine & Pedersen, Jakob Louis & Schmidl, Ricarda & Steiber, , 2013. "Report No. 53: Combining the Entry of Young People in the Labour Market with the Retention of Older Workers," IZA Research Reports 53, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Susan N. Houseman & Anne E. Polivka, 1999. "The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 99-56, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    15. Bruce C. Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2001. "The importance of employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2001-18, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    16. Borland, J. & McDonald, J.T., 2001. "Displaced Workers in Australia 1984-1996: Macroeconomic Conditions and Structural Change," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 824, The University of Melbourne.
    17. Daniel Rodriguez & Madeline Zavodny, 2000. "Explaining changes in the age distribution of displaced workers," Working Paper 2000-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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