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Determinants of hiring older workers: Evidence from Hong Kong

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Author Info

  • John S. Heywood
  • Lok-Sang Ho
  • Xiangdong Wei

Abstract

A 1996 survey of Hong Kong establishments designed to identify hiring and employment patterns by workers' age shows that, as in the United States, many firms employed older workers but did not hire older workers. This pattern appears to reflect mainly economic forces, rather than public policy, given that no laws prohibited age discrimination or required uniform fringe benefit provision in Hong Kong. The empirical evidence from the survey is consistent with two broad hypotheses. First, workers and firms are more willing to invest in training when workers are young. Second, delayed compensation more effectively deters shirking among young workers than among older workers and is more readily accepted by young workers. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 52 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 444-459

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:52:y:1999:i:3:p:444-459

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Cited by:
  1. Machado, C. Sofia & Portela, Miguel, 2013. "Age and Opportunities for Promotion," IZA Discussion Papers 7784, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Caroli, Ève, 2004. "Note de synthèse sur l'emploi des travailleurs âgés face à l'innovation," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 0503, CEPREMAP.
  3. Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Ilmakunnas, Seija, 2012. "Age segregation and hiring of older employees: low mobility revisited," MPRA Paper 37655, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. repec:fth:prinin:436 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Henseke, Golo & Tivig, Thusnelda, 2008. "Age, occupations, and opportunities for older workers in Germany," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 86, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
  6. Pfeifer, Christian, 2009. "An Intra-Firm Perspective on Wage Profiles and Employment of Older Workers with Special Reference to Human Capital and Deferred Compensation," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-413, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  7. Daniel, Kirsten & Heywood, John S., 2007. "The determinants of hiring older workers: UK evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 35-51, January.
  8. Daniel, Kirsten & Siebert, W. Stanley, 2004. "Does Employment Protection Reduce the Demand for Unskilled Labor?," IZA Discussion Papers 1290, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Patrick Aubert & Eve Caroli & Muriel Roger, 2005. "New technologies, workplace organisation and the age structure of the workforce: Firm-level evidence," PSE Working Papers halshs-00590805, HAL.
  10. John Heywood & Uwe Jirjahn & Georgi Tsertsvardze, 2010. "Hiring older workers and employing older workers: German evidence," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 595-615, March.
  11. Stephan Humpert, 2012. "Age and Gender Differences in Job Opportunities," Working Paper Series in Economics 235, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  12. Pål Schøne, 2009. "New technologies, new work practices and the age structure of the workers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 803-826, July.
  13. Koeber, Charles & Wright, David W., 2001. "W/age bias in worker displacement: how industrial structure shapes the job loss and earnings decline of older American workers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 343-352.
  14. Bender, Keith A., 2009. "How are pension integration and pension benefits related?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 26-41, February.
  15. Christian Pfeifer, 2009. "Adjustment of Deferred Compensation Schemes, Fairness Concerns, and Hiring of Older Workers," Working Paper Series in Economics 151, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.

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