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Wage loss following displacement: The role of union coverage

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  • Peter Kuhn
  • Arthur Sweetman

Abstract

Using two Canadian data sets, the authors explore the role of union coverage in displaced workers' wage losses. While only 32% of the workers had unionized jobs prior to displacement, the wage loss suffered by these workers represented about 80% of the wages lost by all displaced workers in both samples. Losing union status was associated with large losses whether or not a worker switched industries after displacement. Extrapolating the results to the United States, the authors estimate that one-third to one-half of U.S. displaced workers' wage losses may be due purely to the loss of union coverage. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 51 (1998)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 384-400

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:51:y:1998:i:3:p:384-400

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Cited by:
  1. Pierre Brochu & Louis-Philippe Morin, 2012. "Union Membership and Perceived Job Insecurity: Thirty Years of Evidence from the American General Social Survey," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(2), pages 263-285, April.
  2. Riddell, W. Craig, 2009. "Economic Change and Worker Displacement in Canada: Consequences and Policy Responses," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-41, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Jul 2009.
  3. Burda, Michael C. & Mertens, Antje, 2001. "Estimating wage losses of displaced workers in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 15-41, January.
  4. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley, 2006. "The Long-Run Cost of Job Loss as Measured by Consumption Changes," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 405, McMaster University.
  5. Eugene Beaulieu & Vivek Dehejia & Hazrat-Omar Zakhilwal, 2004. "International Trade, Labour Turnover, and the Wage Premium: Testing the Bhagwati-Dehejia Hypothesis for Canada," CESifo Working Paper Series 1149, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. A. Lefranc, 2002. "Labor Market Dynamics and Wage Losses of Displaced Workers in France and the United-States," THEMA Working Papers 2002-15, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  7. Chen, Wen-Hao & Morissette, René, 2010. "Have Employment Patterns of Older Displaced Workers Improved Since the Late 1970s?," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2010-20, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 May 2010.

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