Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Gender differences in departures from a large firm

Contents:

Author Info

  • Nachum Sicherman
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Previous studies have found that although women have higher initial quit rates than men, the quit rates of the two groups converge as time on the job lengthens. This study of personnel records from a large company for the years 1971-80 confirms that finding in an analysis that aggregates observations across all reasons for quits. Disaggregation of the data by reason for quitting, however, reveals marked, systematic differences between men and women. Notably, a higher proportion of women than men left their jobs for non-market-related reasons such as household duties and illness in the family; and women were much more likely than men to name higher wages, and not better opportunities, as a reason for switching jobs. Also, the effects of tenure and education on quit rates differed significantly across both gender and reasons for departure. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

    Volume (Year): 49 (1996)
    Issue (Month): 3 (April)
    Pages: 484-504

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:49:y:1996:i:3:p:484-504

    Contact details of provider:
    Fax: 607-255-8016
    Web page: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Postal: 381 Ives East, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3901
    Email:
    Web: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Napari, Sami, 2009. "Gender differences in early-career wage growth," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 140-148, April.
    2. Sami Napari, 2006. "The Early Career Gender Wage Gap," CEP Discussion Papers dp0738, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Angel de la Fuente, 2003. "Human capital in a global and knowledge-based economy," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 576.03, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    4. Munasinghe, Lalith & Reif, Tania & Henriques, Alice, 2008. "Gender gap in wage returns to job tenure and experience," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1296-1316, December.
    5. Liu, Kai, 2012. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap: Estimates from a Dynamic Model of Job Changes and Hours Changes," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 15/2012, Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics.
    6. Frederiksen, Anders, 2008. "Gender differences in job separation rates and employment stability: New evidence from employer-employee data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 915-937, October.
    7. Jill Marie Gunderson & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2004. "Job separation behavior of welfare recipients: results from a unique case study," Working Paper 2004-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    8. Alan Manning, 2010. "Imperfect competition in the labour market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28729, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Erling Barth & Harald Dale-Olsen, 1999. "Monopsonistic Discrimination and the Gender-Wage Gap," NBER Working Papers 7197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Judith Fields & Edward N. Wolff, 1997. "Gender Wage Differentials, Affirmative Action, and Employment Growth on the Industry Level," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_186, Levy Economics Institute.
    11. Gunderson, Jill Marie & Hotchkiss, Julie L., 2007. "Job Separation Behavior of WOTC Workers: Results from a Unique Case Study," MPRA Paper 44801, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Barth, Erling & Dale-Olsen, Harald, 2009. "Monopsonistic discrimination, worker turnover, and the gender wage gap," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 589-597, October.
    13. Drew, Jacqueline & Carless, Sally A. & Thompson, Briony M., 2008. "Predicting turnover of police officers using the sixteen personality factor questionnaire," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 326-331, August.
    14. Garcia-Minguez, Patricio & Sanchez-Losada, Fernando, 2003. "Statistical discrimination and growth: should we subsidize discriminated against workers?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 255-261, May.
    15. Sami Napari, 2006. "The early career gender wage gap," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19844, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    16. Carole Green & Marianne Ferber, 2005. "Do Detailed Work Histories Help to Explain Gender and Race/Ethnic Wage Differentials?," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(1), pages 55-85.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:49:y:1996:i:3:p:484-504. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ILR Review).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.