Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Union effects on nonunion wages: Evidence from panel data on industries and cities

Contents:

Author Info

  • David Neumark
  • Michael L. Wachter

Abstract

The authors test for threat and crowding effects of unions on non-union wages at the industry and city levels, using panel data on the percent organized and nonunion industry and city wage differentials constructed from Current Population Surveys over the period 1973-89. At the industry level, increases in the percent organized were associated with decreases in the nonunion industry wage differential, suggesting that crowding effects were the predominant union effect on nonunion industry wage differentials. In contrast, at the city level increases in the percent organized were associated with increases in the nonunion city wage differential, suggesting that threat effects predominated. The authors also find evidence of negative cross-occupation union effects on nonunion industry wage differentials, supporting their hypothesis that the industry-level results were partly driven by complementarity between union and nonunion labor. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 49 (1995)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 20-38

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:49:y:1995:i:1:p:20-38

Contact details of provider:
Fax: 607-255-8016
Web page: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Postal: 381 Ives East, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3901
Email:
Web: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Bradley Ewing & Phanindra Wunnava, 2002. "Union-Nonunion Wage Differentials and Macroeconomic Activity," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0231, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  2. Ahn, Tom & Arcidiacono, Peter, 2004. "Paying to queue: a theory of locational differences in nonunion wages," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 565-579, May.
  3. Todd Easton & Mary King, 2000. "Differences in Wage Levels Among Metropolitan Areas: Less-educated Workers in the United States," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 21-27.
  4. John DiNardo & Kevin Hallock & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "Unions and Managerial Pay," NBER Working Papers 6318, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Salvatori, Andrea, 2012. "Union threat and non-union employment: A natural experiment on the use of temporary employment in British firms," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 944-956.
  6. Damiano Kulundu Manda & Arne Bigsten & Germano Mwabu, 2005. "Trade union membership and earnings in Kenyan manufacturing firms," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(15), pages 1693-1704.
  7. Barry T. Hirsch & Edward J. Schumacher, . "Union Wages, Rents, and Skills in Health Care Labor Markets," Working Papers 9603, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  8. Kadiyali, Vrinda & Kosová, Renáta, 2013. "Inter-industry employment spillovers from tourism inflows," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 272-281.
  9. W. Robert Reed, 2003. "How Right-To-Work Laws Affect Wages," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 24(4), pages 713-730, October.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:49:y:1995:i:1:p:20-38. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ILR Review).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.